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FBI Warns Taxpayers of Scams For Getting Your W2’s

 The FBI is warning of an increase in new scams that try to trick taxpayers and employers into sending employee records, Social Security numbers, dates of birth, and other sensitive information.

The scams are most often directed at human resources departments in an attempt to trick workers into sending records for large numbers of employees. Often, the people perpetrating these crimes impersonate executives inside a targeted company by compromising or spoofing a trusted email account that asks for all W-2 information on record. 

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2,000 Buses In Ecuador Equipped With Alarms For Sexual Harassment

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Last he San Carlos Cooperative equipped around 2,000 buses in Ecuador with a text message alarm system that responds to sexual harassment reports. When harassment occurs, victims can text ‘ACOSO’ (‘harassment’) to a designated number, along with the number of the bus they’re traveling on. The organization immediately notifies the driver, who makes a loudspeaker announcement. At the same time, police are called to board the bus at the next bus stop, and a psychologist reaches out to the victim.

The issue of sexual harassment on public transport is particularly horrifying in Latin America. But this is a global issue, too. Research suggests 80% of all women experience harassment on public transport, while 90% of these incidents go unreported.

Records Reveal FBI Paid Best Buy Geek Squad As Informants

EFF filed a lawsuit against the Department of Justice in May 2017 seeking records about the FBI’s training and use of Best Buy Geek Squad employees to conduct warrantless searches of customers’ computers.

A federal prosecution of a doctor in California revealed that the FBI has been working for several years to cultivate informants in Best Buy’s national repair facility in Brooks, Kentucky, including reportedly paying eight Geek Squad employees as informants.

EFF sent a FOIA request to the FBI in February 2017 seeking agency records about the use of informants, training of Best Buy personnel in the detection and location of child pornography on computers, and policy statements about using informants at computer repair facilities.The FBI denied the request, saying it doesn’t confirm or deny that it has records that would reveal whether a person or organization is under investigation. A suit  was filed after the Department of Justice failed to respond to our administrative appeal of the FBI’s initial denial.



The Opioid Addiction Crisis

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SAN ANTONIO – Texas saw 1,186 opioid-related deaths in 2015 and experts say the problem is only getting worse. 

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) and the Addiction Policy Forum have announced a new four-year plan. Some doctors are skeptical but hopeful that PhRMA’s vision becomes a reality.

Some of the approaches in mind

 Take an opioid and alter its chemical structure so it won’t be addictive.

Another way is to look at entirely new drugs  and how they may alleviate pain.


They should make note that many of opioid addicts take pills to get high and not for pain. IT’S LIKE THEY HAVE A CHOICE OR PREFERENCE ON HOW THEY WANT TO GET HIGH. They might use pain as a cop out so they won’t be judged harshly. If caught early enough  someone such as a therapist, counselor, social worker etc may help alleviate serious addiction.



China’s Police Facial Recognition Glasses


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Some Police Officers in China will receive China, glasses equipped with facial-scanning technology. 

The glasses, issued to officers at a highly populated train station in the Henan province, are part of a security push leading up to Chinese New Year. So far, according to the state-media report, seven wanted criminals have been caught with the glasses, as well as 26 people using fake IDs. 

LLVision Technology, the company behind the tech, told the Wall Street Journal that the glasses can recognize 100,000 different faces, and can identify a person in 100 milliseconds.

NYPD Gets iPhone 7 & 7 Plus

The New York Police Department is moving away from Windows Phones after two years with the platform and replacing some 36,000 Windows phones with iPhones, which are now being rolled out to police officers…

The Officers get to choose between an iPhone 7 and an iPhone 7 Plus. Currently, officers in Manhattan are taking part in the transition, but once that is complete, the rollout moves to Brooklyn and then Queens.

The iPhones also improve functionality that smartphones bring to officers in general. For instance, smartphone use by police officers can respond to scenes much quicker than relying on the traditional radio:


The New York Daily News reports that the NYPD has been rolling out about 600 phones per day to its officers, who get to choose between an iPhone 7 and an iPhone 7 Plus. Currently, officers in Manhattan are taking part in the transition, but once that is complete, the rollout moves to Brooklyn and then Queens.

The move to iPhone is already being heralded as a major success by some officers. “I truly feel like it’s the ultimate tool to have as a patrol cop,” said Police Officer Christopher Clampitt.

The iPhones also improve functionality that smartphones bring to officers in general. For instance, smartphone use by police officers can respond to scenes much quicker than relying on the traditional radio:

Waymo vs Uber Revolves Around Allegations of Deceit, Betrayal, espionage & A High-Tech Heist


Waymo sued Uber, accusing it of ripping off key pieces of its self-driving car  technology in 2016. Uber paid $680 million for a startup run by Anthony Levandowski, one of the top engineers in a robotic vehicle project that Google began in 2009 and later became in Waymo.

Google was also an early investor in Uber, the relationship eventually soured. Its parent company Alphabet also owns Waymo.

Waymo has drawn a sordid picture, contending that Levandowski stole thousands of documents containing Google trade secrets before defecting to Uber. Waymo says Levandowski conspired with former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick to use the pilfered technology in Uber’s own fleet of self-driving cars.

Uber has boldly denied the allegations in the civil case, which has also triggered a criminal investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice. It’s not clear whether that probe is focused on Uber or Levandowski, who has consistently exercised his right against self-incrimination and is expected to do so again if called to testify during the trial.

Levandowski’s refusal to relinquish his Fifth Amendment rights eventually led Uber to fire him last May, even though he had developed a close relationship with Kalanick.

The stakes in the trial are humongous. Waymo is demanding damages estimated at nearly $2 billion. It also wants a court order that would prevent Uber from using any of the technology that it says was stolen, a move that could hobble the ride-hailing service’s push to design self-driving cars.

The courtroom drama will feature an intriguing cast of characters. The list of expected witnesses includes both the combative Kalanick and Silicon Valley venture capitalist Bill Gurley, an early Uber backer who later helped engineer Kalanick’s departure as Uber’s CEO. (Kalanick resigned under pressure last June.)

Two of the world’s richest people, Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, may also be called to testify about the importance of Waymo’s self-driving project and Levandowski’s role in it.

Both Waymo and Uber each will have only have a total of 16 hours to make their case. That time restraint could prove more daunting for Waymo. It will have to educate a 10-person jury about the intricacies of the eight trade secrets that Uber is accused of stealing, then prove the ride-hailing service used the technology in its vehicles or improperly shared it with others.

The lawsuit has already established internal documents and sworn testimony that exposed spying programs and other shady tactics deployed by Uber to expand its business.

Furthermore, Uber has acknowledged allowing rampant sexual harassment to occur within its ranks, a yearlong cover-up of a major computer break-in and a $100,000 ransom paid to the hackers, and the use of duplicitous software to thwart government regulators.

U.S. District Judge William Alsup has emphasized that Waymo faces the difficult challenge of proving that the ride-hailing service used stolen technology in its self-driving cars.


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