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Posts tagged ‘Cuisine’

Technologies Transforming The Restaurant Industry

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Restaurants have started utilizing Bluetooth temperature monitoring systems to ensure their food and equipment are up to par. Using handheld probes and fixed sensors, restaurants can manually or automatically measure the temperatures of their key assets in as little as four seconds. Managers can program customized limits for each food and equipment and be alerted if any temperatures are beyond their acceptable threshold. These Bluetooth sensors can also wirelessly record temperature readings in a HACCP log so that employees do not have to. This prevents staff from falsifying daily reports.

Optimized schedule makers/scheduling software
There is now software to help them get the job done. In just seconds, managers can generate and distribute a digital weekly schedule to all employees.

Virtual reality onboarding
VR and HR come together to create the newest trend for employee management: Virtual reality onboarding. Using a headset and customized software, new hires can engage in a truly unique experience, without the risks and cost of a normal training session. They can take a 360-degree tour of the facility, watch other employees in action, and test their skills in simulation games. With VR onboarding, trainees don’t have to touch the food or even be in the restaurant to learn how to do their job. There is less pressure on them to avoid mistakes and managers have more time for their other responsibilities.

Kiosks/tabletop tablets
Say goodbye to cash registers and hello to kiosks, the newest in point-of-sale technology. At these kiosks, customers are able to browse the menu, create customized orders, and pay for their meal entirely on their own.

Digital table/reservation manager
 This software does everything from booking reservations directly with customers to suggesting optimal seating arrangements based on time and party size. Restaurants can also give customers accurate wait time estimates and notify them via text when a table is ready for a more pleasurable waiting experience.

Google Wants To Sell Zagat

Google has reportedly held “informal talks” with interested parties for a deal that would encompass the Zagat brand name and website. Mum’s the word on how much Google is after for the service, with Google keeping quite on the matter.

Google Adding Resturant Wait Times

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 Google will now include a pop-up box that appears when you click on a time frame in the popular times’ chart. The box will provide a live or historical data labeled as “busy,” “usually busy,” “usually not busy,” etc., along with the wait time.

Below the popular time’s chart, there’s also a section that helps users plan their visit by offering info on the peak wait times and duration. (e.g. “People typically spend 45 mins to 2 hr here.”)

The new wait time feature will be supported on nearly a million sit-down restaurant listings worldwide, initially in Google Search.

Google is at least partly challenging existing apps like NoWait, which is handy for seeing restaurant wait times.  NoWait also lets you put your name on the list for those restaurants that don’t take reservations Google’s app doesn’t.

You can view the times in the restaurant listings on both mobile and desktop. It will then come to Google Maps to Android, at which point it will expand to include grocery stores, the company says.

Restaurants

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Photographer: PAOLO TERZI Fotografo, Modena

A re-interpreted crab cake at Osteria Francescana, ranked No. 2 this year.

The Top 50 (Last year’s place in parentheses)

  1. Eleven Madison Park, New York (3)
  2. Osteria Francescana, Modena, Italy (1)
  3. El Celler de Can Roca, Girona, Spain (2)
  4. Mirazur, Menton, France (6)
  5. Central, Lima (4)
  6. Asador Etxebarri, Axpe, Spain (10)
  7. Gaggan, Bangkok (23)
  8. Maido, Lima (13)
  9. Mugaritz, San Sebastian, Spain (7)
  10. Steirereck, Vienna (9)
  11. Blue Hill at Stone Barns, Pocantico Hills, New York (48)
  12. Arpège, Paris (19)
  13. Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athénée, Paris (58)
  14. Restaurant André, Singapore (32)
  15. Piazza Duomo, Alba, Italy (17)
  16. D.O.M., São Paulo, Brazil (11)
  17. Le Bernardin, New York (24)
  18. Narisawa, Tokyo (8)
  19. Geranium, Copenhagen (28)
  20. Pujol, Mexico City (25)
  21. Alinea, Chicago (15)
  22. Quintonil, Mexico City (12)
  23. White Rabbit, Moscow (18)
  24. Amber, Hong Kong (20)
  25. Tickets, Barcelona (29)
  26. The Clove Club, London (26)
  27. The Ledbury, London (14)
  28. Nahm, Bangkok (37)
  29. Le Calandre, Rubano, Italy (39)
  30. Arzak, San Sebastian, Spain (21)
  31. Pavillon Ledoyen, Paris (72)
  32. Attica, Melbourne (33)
  33. Astrid y Gastón, Lima (30)
  34. De Librije, Zwolle, Netherlands (38)
  35. Septime, Paris (50)
  36. Dinner by Heston Blumenthal, London (45)
  37. Saison, San Francisco (27)
  38. Azurmendi, Larrabetzu, Spain (16)
  39. Relae, Copenhagen (40)
  40. Cosme, New York (96)
  41. Ultraviolet by Paul Pairet, Shanghai (42)
  42. Boragó, Santiago (36)
  43. Reale, Castel di Sangro, Italy (84)
  44. Brae, Birregurra, Australia (65)
  45. Den, Tokyo (77)
  46. L’Astrance, Paris (57)
  47. Vendôme, Bergisch Gladbach, Germany (35)
  48. Restaurant Tim Raue, Berlin (34)
  49. Tegui, Buenos Aires (68)
  50. Hof van Cleve, Kruishoutem, Belgium (53)

Menu Trends

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 transparency

Fresh, natural and simple are the culinary words of the day. As consumers are taking a greater interest in ingredient lists of packaged food – the shorter the better, the more pronounceable the better – chefs and restaurateurs also look for minimally processed ingredients for their menus.

 grains

Quinoa is ubiquitous these days, but it’s starting to cool off as a hot trend. Its cousins in the ancient grain family are picking up that heat, though. Amaranth, spelt, farro and sorghum may be coming soon to a grain bowl near you.

  • Vegetarian and vegan cuisines

After a few years on the rise among hot menu trends fueled by an increased focus on health and nutrition, vegan and vegetarian cuisines are becoming less trendy. They are not going anywhere, though, as they are gaining momentum as permanent features on restaurant menus. Simultaneously, veggie-centric cuisine continues to heat up, indicating that plant-focused diets are increasingly embraced by both chefs and consumers.

  • Underused meats are on the outs

Meat cuts like chicken feet, pig ears, tongue and oxtail had their moment in the sun as far as being trendy, but the skies are now partly cloudy. And speaking of underused proteins, insects continue to hold the number-one spot on the yesterday’s news list in the What’s Hot in 2017 report.

 

The Culinary Forecast & Whats Hot

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Popular Giant Soup Dumpling

 

 

Qihui Guan age 63,  spends dozens of hours making the enormous soup-filled dumplings that are making New York foodies tremble with desire. “Demand is booming and we can’t keep up! The response has been overwhelming,” only  25 of them are cooked in a day and not a single one more. The soup filling takes eight hours to prepare, while the casing takes two. You can find excited New York couples waiting in line every day so that they too can take a selfie while sipping on the dumpling. And just one hour after opening, it’s all sold out.Located in the East Village New york

 

 

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