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Some Federal Workers Resort To Go fund Me Site

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Dozens of people describing themselves as federal employees are soliciting donations on  “GoFundMe” pages to ease the financial uncertainty ahead of likely missed paychecks. OGE Director Emory Rounds directed agencies on the day of the shutdown to remind their employees “that they remain employees of the federal government during furlough periods.” Standard ethics laws and regulations still apply. Some individual agencies have disseminated their own ethics guidance ahead of the government shutdown.

With the partial shutdown starting  before the Christmas holiday, agencies might not have had time to brief their employees in as much detail as they did during the 2013 lapse in appropriations, Meyer said. The 2013 shutdown ran from Oct. 1 through 17.

The Shut Down

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The Shut down

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More than 400,000 federal employees are working without pay, trash is overflowing in our National Parks, and the presidents of labor unions—one of which is suing President Trump—have said that requiring workers to punch in without pay is “nothing short of inhumane.”

There were still faint glimmers of civilization left in a divided, deadlocked Washington: the 19 Smithsonian Institution museums and galleries along the National Mall remained opened to the public for free due to unused “prior-year funds”; and the National Gallery of Art remained open as well. Even without a paycheck, government employees could check out the Apollo 11 command module at the National Air and Space Museum, the contemporary art in the permanent collection of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Chuck Berry’s sparkling Cadillac Eldorado at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, or Barack and Michelle Obama’s new portraits at the National Portrait Gallery.

The Library of Congress and the U.S. Botanic Garden—and the Capitol Visitor Center and Capitol Building, ironically—are operating as normal, since they were funded by the 2019 Legislative Branch Appropriations Bill.

List of federal shutdowns

1980

On May 1, 1980, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) was shut down for one day after Congress failed to pass an appropriations bill for the agency

1981, 1984, and 1986

On November 23, 1981, 241,000 federal employees were furloughed for one day.The shutdown occurred because President Ronald Reagan vetoed a spending bill that contained a smaller set of spending cuts than he had proposed. The shutdown was estimated to cost taxpayers $80–90 million in back pay and other expenses Not all government departments shut down during the funding gap.

On October 4, 1984, 500,000 federal employees were furloughed for one afternoon.This shutdown occurred due to the inclusion of a water projects package and a civil rights measure that Reagan opposed. The bill was passed the following day after Congress removed these programs, and also included a compromise on funding of the Nicaraguan Contras.

On October 17, 1986, 500,000 federal employees were furloughed for one afternoon over a wide range of issues. The cost was estimated at $62 million in lost work.

1990

The 1990 shutdown occurred over Columbus Day weekend, from Saturday, October 6 through Monday, October 8. The shutdown stemmed from the fact that a deficit reduction package negotiated by President George H. W. Bush contained tax increases, despite his campaign promise of “read my lips: no new taxes”,leading to a revolt led by then House Minority Whip Newt Gingrich that defeated the initial appropriations package

1995–1996

The two shutdowns of 1995 and 1995–96 were the result of conflicts between Democratic President Bill Clinton and the Republican Congress over funding for Medicare, education, the environment, and public health in the 1996 federal budget. The government shut down after Clinton vetoed the spending bill the Republican Party-controlled Congress sent him. Government workers were furloughed and non-essential services suspended during November 14–19, 1995 (for 5 days), and from December 16, 1995, to January 6, 1996 (for 22 days), in total 27 days.

2013

Letter from President Barack Obama to US Government employees affected by the shutdown in 2013

The 2013 shutdown lasted 16 days, beginning on Tuesday, October 1, 2013. During the shutdown, approximately 800,000 federal employees were furloughed for 16 days, while another 1.3 million were required to report to work without known payment dates

January 2018

The first shutdown of 2018 began at midnight EST on Saturday, January 20. On January 19, a bill failed to pass the Senate 50–49 with the majority of Democrats voting “no”.Five Republicans voted “no” and five Democrats voted “yes” in the Republican majority senate (60 votes were required for passage). Senate Democrats insisted that the issue of immigration, specifically the funding of DACA, be addressed in the budget.

February 2018

A related funding gap occurred during the first 9 hours of Friday, February 9, 2018 EST. The funding gap was widely referred to in media reports as a second shutdown, although no workers were furloughed and government services were not disrupted because the funding gap occurred overnight and was resolved close to the beginning of the workday.

December 2018–January 2019

The third shutdown of 2018 began at midnight EST on Saturday, December 22 with a House-passed continuing resolution to fund the United States Government awaiting a full floor vote in the Senate. The point of contention was the inclusion of $5.7 billion in funding for a border wall that was a core Trump campaign promise.Under pressure from vocal members of his political base such as Ann Coulter and Rush Limbaugh for failing to secure the funding, Trump claimed ownership of the shutdown while in a televised meeting with Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer.This shutdown is ongoing as of January 2019.

Roughly 380,000 federal workers were placed on unpaid leave, while some 420,000 “essential” personnel were required to work without pay, including tens of thousands of workers in federal law enforcement and national security positions, such as FBI, Border Patrol, Secret Service and Transportation Security Administration agents. Hundreds of TSA agents at major airports called in sick during the second week of the shutdown, reportedly in protest or to pick up income elsewhere. The Washington Post reported on 4 January 2019 that the Trump administration had not anticipated the shutdown would be prolonged and were now grasping the consequences of an extended shutdown, including sharp reductions in SNAP payments and delays of $140 billion in tax refunds

Amazon to Pay Workers $15.00 Minimum Wage

 

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The company’s workforce management practices have come under criticism from both lawmakers and employees in recent years. Some staffers are pursuing legal action against Amazon over claims of unpaid wages, while others are pushing to unionize.

Amazon’s wage raise could also boost its recruiting efforts amid low unemployment and moves by rival retailers to offer more competitive compensation. Walmart Inc. raised the minimum hourly rate for its employees to $11 an hour in January, while Target Corp. set its base pay to $12 a few months later and plans to hit the $15 mark by the end of 2020.

Amazon will start offering more competitive wages in the U.K. as well. The company plans to raise the minimum hourly wage to £10.50, or $13.60, in London and to £9.50, or $12.30, for the rest of the U.K. effective Nov. 1.

Schools Educating A Weed Workforce

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The University of Ottawa is offering a Cannabis Law course.  Dubois, a partner at the Ottawa law office of Perley-Robertson, Hill & McDougall, and colleague Megan Wallace will be the lead instructors of the new cannabis law course at the University of Ottawa. The course, the first of its kind in Canada, will run for about three weeks. Students will learn about the licensing and regulatory frameworks of the cannabis industry as well as how legalizing the drug will affect everything from employment to property law. Diane Labelle, general counsel at Health Canada Legal Services, will teach a similar course at uOttawa in French this fall.

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Commercial landlords now face heavy penalties for allowing pot to be sold at their properties, a situation that will have to change in time for private retailers to hit the market next April.

Dubois course will also feature a field trip to the Tweed production facility in Smiths Falls, where students will get a first-hand look at the product they’re learning about.

Southern Ontario’s Niagara College announced it was launching a one-year post-graduate commercial cannabis production program developed in conjunction with more than a dozen licensed producers, including Tweed parent Canopy Growth.

Ryerson University in Toronto, meanwhile, said this summer its Ted Rogers School of Management would be introducing a course ​– appropriately numbered 420 ​– called “the Business of Cannabis,” focusing on topics such as retailing, marketing, quality control and financing. And Montreal’s McGill University plans to enter the field by offering a diploma program in cannabis and cannabis production, starting next fall.

The cannabis industry has an urgent need for workers with highly specialized skills in areas such as genetics, horticulture, cultivation techniques, pest control and biotechnology.

 Skills are some what borrowed from pharmaceutical or food industries, but it is still quite different because the cannabis industry is complex. There are a lot of components to the cannabis industry.

Best Places for Women Entrepreneurs

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Top Places for Women Entrepreneurs

Rank Metro Final Score Business Income for Women Compared to Women’s Earnings in Metro Women in Business % of Businesses Owned by Women
Median Average Median Average % of Women Workers Who Are Self-Employed % of Self-Employed Women Who Are Incorporated Self-Employed Incorporated
1 San Francisco 80.5 $10,378 $31,880 17.6% 41.8% 10.6% 20.8% 41.7% 32.1%
2 Austin, Texas 72.2 $8,262 $25,345 19.6% 48.1% 9.0% 24.9% 38.6% 30.1%
3 San Jose, Calif. 67 $7,657 $30,334 12.6% 38.8% 8.3% 22.7% 41.1% 32.2%
4 Memphis, Tenn. 65 $9,068 $20,399 24.9% 45.5% 5.6% 27.0% 35.1% 29.8%
5 Nashville, Tenn. 64.8 $8,866 $23,373 22.9% 49.0% 7.1% 20.1% 34.9% 27.4%
6 Los Angeles 63.7 $7,758 $20,945 18.6% 37.4% 10.9% 24.8% 37.9% 30.7%
7 San Diego 63.6 $8,060 $20,949 18.5% 37.8% 10.0% 24.2% 39.3% 30.2%
8 Sacramento, Calif. 61.6 $7,053 $23,596 15.0% 41.0% 8.4% 21.1% 39.1% 31.9%
9 Seattle 57.6 $4,534 $22,713 9.2% 37.0% 8.6% 30.6% 42.1% 32.7%
10 Cincinnati 56.9 $7,556 $21,432 18.6% 42.2% 5.4% 29.1% 35.4% 28.5%
11 Raleigh, N.C. 56.3 $3,526 $23,664 8.1% 44.0% 7.4% 36.7% 38.4% 31.4%
12 Boston 54.7 $8,060 $22,574 15.3% 33.8% 7.0% 24.3% 39.0% 28.3%
13 Las Vegas 54.3 $5,037 $17,566 13.8% 38.5% 6.6% 30.6% 39.6% 33.4%
14 Washington 53.4 $5,037 $23,448 8.6% 32.7% 7.2% 31.3% 41.4% 32.1%
15 Portland, Ore. 52.9 $4,030 $17,389 9.3% 31.7% 10.2% 29.8% 42.5% 33.8%
16 Denver 52.5 $3,022 $19,820 6.6% 35.0% 9.1% 37.3% 40.4% 33.6%
17 Houston 52 $7,254 $19,029 17.7% 36.3% 7.7% 23.5% 36.0% 28.3%
18 Hartford, Conn. 48.2 $8,060 $22,710 15.8% 37.1% 5.8% 25.1% 34.1% 24.2%
19 Phoenix 47 $4,534 $16,352 11.5% 33.5% 7.9% 31.8% 37.5% 31.5%
20 Providence, R.I. 46.2 $7,053 $18,161 16.1% 33.9% 5.5% 28.8% 34.9% 27.7%
21 New Orleans 46.1 $6,045 $13,475 16.7% 29.8% 7.7% 34.5% 34.9% 30.2%
22 Dallas 45.7 $5,037 $17,407 12.2% 33.9% 7.5% 26.5% 37.2% 30.4%
23 Kansas City, Mo. 45.4 $3,627 $18,160 9.0% 37.3% 6.6% 30.8% 38.2% 31.0%
24 New York 44.6 $5,037 $20,053 10.0% 31.1% 7.6% 32.0% 36.8% 28.2%
24 Baltimore 44.6 $4,937 $17,227 9.8% 28.4% 6.2% 34.2% 39.2% 31.9%
26 Riverside, Calif. 44.5 $5,037 $16,373 13.3% 34.4% 7.9% 23.7% 35.6% 30.6%
27 Miami 43.3 $3,526 $13,004 9.9% 28.8% 10.7% 39.4% 36.5% 29.6%
28 Columbus, Ohio 42.6 $3,022 $22,010 7.3% 43.5% 5.6% 26.6% 36.3% 27.8%
29 Minneapolis 42.3 $4,332 $18,113 9.2% 31.1% 6.8% 34.0% 37.9% 28.7%
30 Milwaukee 40.9 $4,030 $18,281 9.6% 35.6% 5.0% 34.0% 35.8% 28.8%
31 San Antonio 40.3 $4,030 $16,246 11.2% 36.5% 6.5% 24.7% 35.4% 30.0%
32 Atlanta 40.1 $3,022 $15,809 7.3% 30.6% 7.7% 37.4% 36.6% 30.7%
33 Tampa, Fla. 39.6 $3,022 $13,931 8.0% 29.3% 7.7% 42.8% 36.1% 30.2%
34 Charlotte, N.C. 37.8 $4,030 $13,470 10.4% 27.1% 6.6% 35.2% 36.6% 30.7%
35 Orlando, Fla. 35.3 $1,007 $13,833 2.9% 31.3% 7.5% 43.3% 36.8% 31.2%
36 Richmond, Va. 34.6 $1,813 $15,257 4.3% 29.2% 6.1% 33.7% 39.2% 31.8%
37 Salt Lake City 34.3 $2,518 $15,600 6.8% 34.4% 7.0% 30.9% 37.2% 26.2%
38 Oklahoma City 33.6 $2,015 $14,189 5.7% 32.6% 7.7% 32.6% 35.8% 29.2%
39 Virginia Beach, Va. 33.2 $2,317 $12,850 6.1% 27.7% 5.8% 32.9% 39.5% 31.6%
40 Jacksonville, Fla. 32.4 $1,511 $14,078 4.0% 30.3% 6.8% 39.2% 36.6% 29.5%
41 Buffalo, N.Y. 31.5 $5,037 $14,594 12.3% 29.8% 4.7% 28.8% 34.2% 25.2%
42 St. Louis 30.2 $2,015 $13,673 5.0% 27.7% 5.8% 33.5% 36.9% 30.9%
43 Chicago 30 $2,015 $14,622 4.5% 25.8% 6.3% 37.8% 36.3% 29.4%
44 Birmingham, Ala. 28.8 $2,015 $16,139 5.3% 35.8% 5.7% 31.6% 33.1%

Brand New Biometrics Scanner Detects Impostor @ U.S. Airport

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A biometric facial scanner has flagged a traveler using a fake passport — less than three days after the airport system was installed. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection detained a traveler earlier this week after the facial recognition system brought up an ID that didn’t match the man’s passport at the Washington Dulles International Airport.

 

CBP has more

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