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N ational Book Awards 2018

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The National Book Foundation has announced the long list of 10 books for the 2018 National Book Award for fiction. Finalists will be revealed on Oct. 10.

Fiction

Jamel Brinkley, “A Lucky Man” (Graywolf Press)

Jennifer Clement, “Gun Love” (Hogarth)

Lauren Groff, “Florida” (Riverhead)

Daniel Gumbiner, “The Boatbuilder” (McSweeney’s)

Brandon Hobson, “Where the Dead Sit Talking” (Soho Press)

Tayari Jones, “An American Marriage” (Algonquin)

Rebecca Makkai, “The Great Believers” (Viking)

Sigrid Nunez, “The Friend” (Riverhead)

Tommy Orange, “There There” (Knopf)

Nafissa Thompson-Spires, “Heads of the Colored People” (Atria)

Winners will be announced Nov. 14 at a ceremony in New York City.

 

Non Fiction

Carol Anderson, “One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy” (Bloomsbury)

Colin G. Calloway, “The Indian World of George Washington: The First President, the First Americans, and the Birth of the Nation” (Oxford University Press)

Steve Coll, “Directorate S: The C.I.A. and America’s Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan” (Penguin Press)

Marwan Hisham and Molly Crabapple, “Brothers of the Gun: A Memoir of the Syrian War” (One World)

Victoria Johnson, “American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic” (Liveright)

David Quammen, “The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life” (Simon & Schuster)

Sarah Smarsh, “Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth” (Scribner)

Rebecca Solnit, “Call Them by Their True Names: American Crises (and Essays)” (Haymarket)

Jeffrey C. Stewart, “The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke” (Oxford)

Adam Winkler, “We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights” (Liveright)

 

Over A Century Ago Being A Victorian Librarian Was Dangerous

Melvil Dewey predicted they would suffer ill health, strain, and breakdowns.

It Seems That Wikipedia Has A Gender & Race Problem

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The world’s fifth-most-visited website has a long-running problem with gender bias: Only 18 percent of its biographies are of women. Surveys estimate that between 84 and 90 percent of Wikipedia editors are male. Quicksilver, is a software tool by San Francisco startup Primer designed to help Wikipedia editors fill in blind spots in the crowdsourced encyclopedia. Its under representation of women in science is a particular target. Quicksilver uses machine-learning algorithms to scour news articles and scientific citations to find notable scientists missing from Wikipedia, and then write fully sourced draft entries for them. 

The summaries it generates are intended to provide a starting point for Wikipedia editors, who can clean up errors and check the sources to prevent any algorithmic slip-ups contaminating the site.

What Do Librarians Do?

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Click Here To Find Out

 

Comey Book Sales Top 600,000 The First Week

Comey book sales top 600,000 in first week
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Former FBI Director James Comey‘s new book, “A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership,” sold more than 600,000 copies in its first week, including print, audio and e-books, according to the book’s publisher, Macmillan’s Flatiron Books.

United States Library Of Congress-Carla Hayden

Enlarge/ This is a page from Oh, the Places You’ll Boldly Go!, which Dr. Seuss Enterprises claims infringes its copyright.
A judge has allowed a lawsuit to move forward against the creators of Oh, the Places You’ll Boldly Go!—a nearly page-for-page remix of the Dr. Seuss classic Oh, the Places You’ll Go! and Star Trek. This decision reverses an earlier ruling.After receiving a new court filing, US District Judge Janis Sammartino found that ComicMix, the company behind the new work, could not so easily have the case dismissed.

The new book originally raised tens of thousands of dollars on Kick starter before being taken down in October 2016. A lawsuit ensued soon after. Dr. Seuss Enterprises v. Comic Mix LLC, which was filed in federal court in San Diego in November 2016. Dr. Seuss Enterprises (DSE) represents the works of the now-deceased but still iconic children’s book author, Theodor Geisel.

DSE argued that ComicMix’s new mashup infringed on its intellectual property rights, while ComicMix argued that it was allowed under the fair use doctrine of American copyright law. That notion allows for certain remixes to be created and sold under certain conditions without violating the original copyright.

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