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Archive for the ‘Healthcare’ Category

A Wearable To Detect Germs & Viruses?

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Rutgers engineers have invented biosensor technology – aka lab on a chip – that could be used in hand-held or wearable devices to monitor your health and exposure to dangerous bacteria, viruses and pollutants.
Electronic detection of microparticles allows for ultra-compact instruments needed for wearable devices. The Rutgers researchers’ technique for barcoding particles is, for the first time, fully electronic. That allows biosensors to be shrunken to the size of a wearable band or a micro-chip, the study says.

The technology is over 95 percent accurate in identifying biomarkers and fine-tuning is underway to make it 100 percent accurate. The team is also working on portable detection of microrganisms, including disease-causing bacteria and viruses. Should be available in about two years.

 

Warning! Gene Editing Technology & It’s Danger

 

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CRISPR gene-editing technology has been the new rave in the medical world. Showing potential for treating diseases ranging from cancerto type 2 diabetes,  the technology has been moving full-steam ahead, with a trial in humans already started, even as the repercussions of gene editing remain largely unknown.

A recent study has highlighted the uncertainties, showing that unintended mutations may result when you dice and splice the human genome, they it’s too ealy to say whether the mutations are a cause for alarm.

 

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/06/13/crispr-gene-editing-dangers.aspx

Google Hire

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Google Hire allows employers post job listings, then accept and manage applications, according to job listing links spotted by Axios reader Colin Heilbut. So far, several tech companies seem to be using (or testing) Google Hire, including Medisas, Poynt, DramaFever, SingleHop, and CoreOS. Google has assured, that “Only information that a candidate voluntarily provides would be passed to a prospective employer as part of their online application.”

 

 

Ageing Seen As Positive

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Dr Paul Ong, Technical Officer, Innovation for Healthy Ageing at the World Health Organization, says “ageing, on the whole, is “a good thing” for the world, and governments should not see it as a “threat”.  He says,  being old is, in fact, a sign of “successful development,” he says. “It means that a majority of people are now living to a much older age.”

On Being Black in the White-Dominated Weed Business

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Medical marijuana is currently legal in roughly 28 states (and Washington, D.C.), and recreational use is now legal in eight states—there’s been a wave of entrepreneurs sparking up new streams of income in the marijuana business. But it’s mostly whites who are making a profit from this “green rush.”Outside of the celebrity-endorsed bud brands, there are just a handful of everyday black folk who have been successful in opening up a cannabis company of their own or attaining leadership positions for existing weed businesses.

Read More, According to an investigative report by Buzzfeed, only 1 percent (fewer than three dozen) of the 3,200 to 3,600 marijuana dispensaries in America are black-owned.

 

The Future Of Healthcare & It’s Tranformation

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The pressure to ensure accessibility, affordability, quality and sustainability, while leveraging technology in healthcare, will be on in the coming year.

As healthcare moves into the future, the quest for quality and affordability continues to be the key driver for transformation.Traditional healthcare is often said to be more “disease-care” than “healthcare”, with healthcare systems focusing on caring for the sick, expanding and improving infrastructure, and figuring out long-term financing for healthcare in an aging population. Increasingly, both medical science as well as consumers are recognizing that prevention is better than cure, especially for chronic diseases.

There has also been a overabundance of health and wellness apps – from nutrition apps to fitness trackers monitored by wearable sensors – that support this shift.Such technology not only monitors and offers insights on a person’s physiological status, but also recommends nearby healthy eateries and food selections, fitness-related events as well as exercise facilities.

This places personal health and preventative care rightfully back into the individual’s hands, shifting the outcome towards a more active and healthier community.

Health care’s resistance to transform is likely bolstered by concerns about patient data privacy, a dependence on highly specialized skills, professional ethics and a traditional emphasis on the human touch in the practice of medicine.

In Singapore, all hospitals have gone digital to a large extent, and the Government is encouraging nursing homes and GP (general practitioner) clinics across the island to follow suit.

With an Electronic Medical Record system, real-time Integrated Health Information Systems and an automated inpatient pharmacy already implemented, the next step for hospitals will be widespread tele­health services for discharged patients and the elderly in the community.

Robotics customized for the healing environment can improve patient care while relieving manpower shortages, and provide a better working environment.With everything including life-support systems hyper-connected in the Internet of Things (Io T) , cyber security will become of utmost importance.

In order to adapt to societal needs, modern healthcare professionals need to be well-educated in the management of technological capabilities and deliver patient-centric solutions.

IBM’s Has A Five Year Plan to Remake Healthcare

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A silicon wafer designed to sort particles found in bodily fluids for the purpose of early disease detection.

IBM’s research labs are already working on a chip that can diagnose a potentially fatal condition faster than the best lab in the country, a camera that can see so deeply into a pill it can tell if its molecular structure has more in common with a real or counterfeit tablet, and a system that can help identify if a patient has a mental illness just from the words they use.

More work have to be done before the systems are ready for rolling out commercially. The next few years could also see IBM using artificial intelligence and new analytical techniques to produce a ‘lab on a chip’ — a pocket-sized device that would be able to analyse a single drop of blood or other bodily fluid to find evidence of bacteria, viruses, or elements like proteins that could be indicative of an illness.

 Digital manufacturing and 3D printing type technologies can put sensors in custom designed probes, which would effectively do the analysis and tell the medical professionals what they’re looking for.Rather than having to wait days or weeks after a blood test for a virus to be cultured enough for it to be identified, these tiny labs on a chip could pick up the smallest traces of the organism.

Perhaps its greatest use, however, could be allowing people to know about health conditions before any symptoms begin to show.

While analyzing the contents of a drop of blood at a nanoscale level will need huge AI processing power, the real challenge for IBM in bringing labs on a chip to market is in the silicon. Mental health, however, is one area where artificial intelligence will chew up vast quantities of data and turn it into useful information for clinicians. Over the next two years, IBM will be creating a prototype of a machine learning system that can help mental health professionals diagnose patients just from the content of their speech.

Speech is already one of the key components that doctors and psychiatrists will use to detect the onset of mental illness, checking for signs including the rate, volume, and choice of words. Now, IBM is hoping that artificial intelligence can do the same, by analyzing what a patient says or writes — from their consultations with a doctor or the content of their Twitter feeds.

IBM already has form with such tools: one of the first commercial uses of Watson, Big Blue’s cognitive computing system, was as a doctor’s assistant for cancer care. Now the company is working with hospitals and other partners to build prototypes for other cognitive tools in healthcare. IBM hopes using machine learning will make the process faster and give an additional layer of insight.

 

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