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Chan Zuckerberg’s Initiative For Home Down Payments For Teachers

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The $45 billion Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is putting $5 million into a fund called  Landed,  that offers to pay up to half of the 20% home down payment for educators with zero interest or monthly payments. Instead, Landed recoups its investment when the home is sold or refinanced, assuming up to 25% of the appreciation or depreciation of the home’s value.

The goal is to allow more teachers, administrators, janitors, and more to live near their jobs at Palto Alto California, Redwood City, Ravenswood City, and Sequoia Union high schools, where Silicon Valley’s tech boom has made home prices too expensive to purchase.

No More Black Harlem!

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Black residents have been present in Harlem continually since the 1630s, and as the neighborhood modernized in the late 19th century, they could be found especially in the area around 125th Street and in the “Negro tenements” on West 130th Street. By 1900, tens of thousands lived in Harlem. The mass migration of blacks into the area began in 1904, due to another real estate crash, the worsening of conditions for blacks elsewhere in the city, and the leadership of black real estate entrepreneurs including Phillip Payton, Jr. After the collapse of the 1890s, new speculation and construction started up again in 1903 and the resulting glut of housing led to a crash in values in 1904 and 1905 that eclipsed the late-19th century slowdown. Landlords could not find white renters for their properties, so Philip Payton stepped in to bring blacks. His company, the Afro-American Realty Company, has been credited with the migration of blacks from their previous neighborhoods, the Tenderloin, San Juan Hill (now the site of Lincoln Center), Minetta Lane in Greenwich Village and Hell’s Kitchen in the west 40s and 50s.[42][43] The move to northern Manhattan was driven in part by fears that anti-black riots such as those that had occurred in the Tenderloin in 1900 and in San Juan Hill in 1905 might recur. In addition, a number of tenements that had been occupied by blacks in the west 30s were destroyed at this time to make way for the construction of the original Penn Station.

In 1907, black churches began to move uptown. Several congregations built grand new church buildings, including St Philip’son West 134th Street just west of Seventh Avenue (the wealthiest church in Harlem), the Abyssinian Baptist Church on West 138th Street and St Mark’s Methodist Church on Edgecombe Avenue. More often churches purchased buildings from white congregations of Christians and Jews whose members had left the neighborhood, including Metropolitan Baptist Church on West 128th and Seventh Avenue, St James Presbyterian Church on West 141st Street, and Mt Olivet Baptist Church on Lenox Avenue.  Only the Catholic Church retained its churches in Harlem, with white priests presiding over parishes that retained significant numbers of whites until the 1930s.

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The Fastest Whitening Neighborhoods In The United States

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From White Flight To White Infill In The United States: Here’s What May be Happening In Your Neighborhood

 

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A Look At Segregation In The United States

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Developers Racing To Turn Brooklyn New York Into A Thriving Tech Office Market

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Demand is cooling as development across the East River  to Brooklyn New York surges, with 9.6 million square feet of offices slated for completion by the end of 2020. Developers and investors behind projects including the former Domino Sugar plant, the Watchtower Building and the retired Schlitz Brewery are aiming to draw TAMI ((technology, advertising, media, and information) tenants, and Brooklyn’s emergence as one of the U.S.’s top tech centers is threatened unless there’s a reversal of the slowdown. Venture-capital investment in New York firms, including technology companies, fell to $1.4 billion in the second quarter. San Francisco, the epicenter of the U.S. tech industry, the office-vacancy .rate rose to 7.3% in the second quarter, the first increase since 2013.

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