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Posts tagged ‘Race’

Hair Policing Children Of Color 2017

 

Just this past Sunday, the trustees of the Mystic Valley Regional Charter School, near Boston, suspended a dress code policy that banned hair extensions, including the braided variety that many black girls sport.

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No More Black Harlem!

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Black residents have been present in Harlem continually since the 1630s, and as the neighborhood modernized in the late 19th century, they could be found especially in the area around 125th Street and in the “Negro tenements” on West 130th Street. By 1900, tens of thousands lived in Harlem. The mass migration of blacks into the area began in 1904, due to another real estate crash, the worsening of conditions for blacks elsewhere in the city, and the leadership of black real estate entrepreneurs including Phillip Payton, Jr. After the collapse of the 1890s, new speculation and construction started up again in 1903 and the resulting glut of housing led to a crash in values in 1904 and 1905 that eclipsed the late-19th century slowdown. Landlords could not find white renters for their properties, so Philip Payton stepped in to bring blacks. His company, the Afro-American Realty Company, has been credited with the migration of blacks from their previous neighborhoods, the Tenderloin, San Juan Hill (now the site of Lincoln Center), Minetta Lane in Greenwich Village and Hell’s Kitchen in the west 40s and 50s.[42][43] The move to northern Manhattan was driven in part by fears that anti-black riots such as those that had occurred in the Tenderloin in 1900 and in San Juan Hill in 1905 might recur. In addition, a number of tenements that had been occupied by blacks in the west 30s were destroyed at this time to make way for the construction of the original Penn Station.

In 1907, black churches began to move uptown. Several congregations built grand new church buildings, including St Philip’son West 134th Street just west of Seventh Avenue (the wealthiest church in Harlem), the Abyssinian Baptist Church on West 138th Street and St Mark’s Methodist Church on Edgecombe Avenue. More often churches purchased buildings from white congregations of Christians and Jews whose members had left the neighborhood, including Metropolitan Baptist Church on West 128th and Seventh Avenue, St James Presbyterian Church on West 141st Street, and Mt Olivet Baptist Church on Lenox Avenue.  Only the Catholic Church retained its churches in Harlem, with white priests presiding over parishes that retained significant numbers of whites until the 1930s.

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Things People Don’t Notice

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 Racism Is Still Prevalent

Washington Post Article

On Being Black in the White-Dominated Weed Business

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Medical marijuana is currently legal in roughly 28 states (and Washington, D.C.), and recreational use is now legal in eight states—there’s been a wave of entrepreneurs sparking up new streams of income in the marijuana business. But it’s mostly whites who are making a profit from this “green rush.”Outside of the celebrity-endorsed bud brands, there are just a handful of everyday black folk who have been successful in opening up a cannabis company of their own or attaining leadership positions for existing weed businesses.

Read More, According to an investigative report by Buzzfeed, only 1 percent (fewer than three dozen) of the 3,200 to 3,600 marijuana dispensaries in America are black-owned.

 

From White Flight To White Infill In The United States: Here’s What May be Happening In Your Neighborhood

 

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Afro Brazilian Civilian Civil Rights Group Are Taking Racists Comments To The billboard

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Afro-Brazilian civil rights group Criola is taking racist comments posted on Twitter or Facebook. After  identifying the location of the commenter, they then buy billboard space near that person’s home in order to display the comment in huge letters.

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American Author Rick Riodan’s Character No Longer Whitewashed

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Russian publisher is no longer “whitewashing” Rick Riordan’s jacket illustration character Carter, an African American boy who has been depicted as white on the covers of various foreign language editions of Riordan’s young adult series.

Carter’s skin is “dark brown”, like his Egyptologist father, he tells readers in the first pages of The Red Pyramid. His sister Sadie’s is much lighter, as she takes after their mother, who was white. “Carter, you’re getting older. You’re an African American man. People will judge you more harshly, and so you must always look impeccable,” his father tells him.

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Riordan’s foreign publishers in countries including Russia, Italy and the Netherlands have featured cover images of Carter as a white boy. “Pretty art but I’m not amused how they whitewash Carter,” wrote Riordan of the Italian jacket last year.

The Dutch publisher subsequently listened to Riordan’s concerns, the author said, and revised the covers “so that Carter Kane actually looks African American rather than whitewashed”.His Russian publisher has now followed suit, prompting Riordan to write last week: “Thank you to my Russian publisher EKSMO for listening to my concerns. They have fixed the Kane Chronicles covers so Carter is no longer whitewashed. This art will be featured on any future reprints.”

Riordan  writer for the Percy Jackson series, is one of the world’s richest authors.With the exception of the US and UK, Riordan don’t even see the covers until they are published.

Alexandra Strick, manager and co-founder of Inclusive Minds, which campaigns for diversity in children’s books, said the issue of “whitewashing” was “still a very major problem in children’s books”.

“There have been many high-profile cases of characters actually changing colour completely, so described in the story as black but then appearing Caucasian on the cover. However, very often it’s more subtle than that, with the cover of a book about a non-white character often avoiding featuring a human face at all, or with the character featured in silhouette or even with their face turned away. Sometimes it’s a case of publishers asking that a character is ‘less dark’ almost as though mixed race is acceptable but somehow black skin isn’t.”

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