Always Providing You With Ongoing Information

Posts tagged ‘Automation’

Levi Jeans & Automation

Eureka Lab [Photo: courtesy of Levi’s]
A team of designers took weeks to figure out exactly where to fade the indigo and position the tears for the most authentic vintage look. Then, factory workers used sandpaper and harsh chemicals to make it look properly worn in. The jeans were probably washed for hours so that the blue color would fade out–even though those dyes would inevitably end up polluting the groundwater. It could take weeks for a team of Levi designers to figure out exactly where to fade the indigo and position the tears for the most authentic vintage look.

They now have a new laser technology that will, in a snap, do what now takes much longer. The breakthrough uses infrared light to etch off a very fine layer of the indigo and cotton from a pair of jeans, creating the same kind of faded finishes and tears in 90 seconds flat.

This new tech, which Sights will automate many new aspects of the company’s denim-making process, from the design and prototyping to the manufacturing, to catering to consumer demand.

[Photo: courtesy of Levi’s]

The company employs 13,500 workers around the world—not including those that work in third-party factories. Levi’s jeans are sold at 50,000 retailers in 110 countries. This will will mean retraining hundreds of people and changing the time it takes to get products to stores. But by introducing these laser-wielding robots into Levi’s factories around the world, it has the potential to eliminate many repetitive, dangerous tasks that are an everyday part of the job for denim workers.

[Photo: courtesy of Levi’s]

[Photo: courtesy of Levi’s]

Between 80 and 100 billion never-worn garments are sent to landfills globally every year. This new technology will shift our model from ‘sell what you make’ to ‘make what you sell,’ which will absolutely improve their overall inventory health.

Advertisements

business suit3_001

AI technologies like speech analytics, deep-learning platforms and natural language generation have exploded onto the scene in the past 12 months. Soon firms will be able to automate and scale in a more efficient way because software will ultimately be able to learn and adapt rather than require programming.

Automation will transform the workforce as technology advances result in humans increasingly working side by side with software robots These robots don’t herald a gloomy future for jobs. As we showed in our report. Working Side By Side With Robots, automation will replace some jobs and create others, with a net loss of 9.8 million US jobs by 2027 — while transforming at least 25 percent of the remaining jobs.

Will Robots Take Your Job?

Snapshotpinktop_001

Designed and developed by Dimitar Raykov and Mubashar Iqbal, uses data from the 2013 report, “The Future of Employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerisation?” as well as data from the Bureau of Labor. The researchers for that study estimated 47 percent of total US employment is at risk of automation.

You can search for your own gig (reporters and correspondents are at an 11 percent risk of automation, or hit the randomized button to see an example from their database (metal and plastic pattern makers are at 90 percent risk). Alongside the risk percentage are projected growth rates in the next seven years, the amount of people sharing that job title as of 2016, and median annual wage.

Sorry To say data reveals positions such as Bank Tellers, Postal Clerks, Office Clerks, Cashiers,Retail sales person are about 96% doomed. Librarians 65% Train Operators 86% Dispatchers except Police Fire 3ll

Click Here To Find If Robots Will Take Your Job

Map Tells Which Cities Likely To Lose Jobs To Robots

As the map shows, almost all large metropolitan areas can lose over 55% of their current jobs due to automation. The ones that fare better than others include high-tech centers like Silicon Valley and Boston.

Lower income jobs face higher automation risk, the effect on employment will be much more drastic than the effect on wages. MSAs with a high share of low paying jobs will have larger job and wage losses. The researchers emphasize that probability of automation does not equal future unemployment rates: “Technical feasibility does not imply that automation necessarily makes economic sense. And historically, automation went hand in hand with new job creation both in skilled and less skilled labor,” explains Dr. Chen. “However, the speed and the high share of automation in less skilled jobs raises many questions about whether the economy will be able to make up for the expected job losses. They expect that automation will create winners and losers among cities and regions of the U.S.,

Metropolitan Statistical Area Share of Jobs Automatable
1 Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV 65.2%
2 El Paso, TX 63.9%
3 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA 62.6%
4 Greensboro-High Point, NC 62.5%
5 North Port-Sarasota- Bradenton, FL 62.4%
6 Bakersfield, CA 62.4%
7 Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL 61.8%
8 Fresno, CA 61.5%
9 Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin, SC 61.3%
10 Louisville/Jefferson County, KY-IN 61.3%

The White house Report On Artificial Intelligence & America’s Employees

purple-sweater2_002

The White House released a new report this week entitled Artificial Intelligence, Automation, and the Economy, as part of an admirable but very flawed initiative to understand the impact of the new technology on American employees.

The White House said, “Accelerating AI capabilities will enable automation of some tasks that have long required human labor”. The report says some low wage jobs will become obsolete. Research consistently finds that the jobs that are threatened by automation are highly concentrated among lower-paid, lower-skilled, and less-educated workers. This means that automation will continue to put downward pressure on demand for this group, putting downward pressure on wages and upward pressure on inequality.  Robots are taking orders and making food; customers are growing accustomed to the lack of human interaction.

These transformations will open up new opportunities for individuals, the economy, and society, on the other hand, has the potential to disrupt the current livelihoods of millions of Americans. Whether AI leads to unemployment and increases in inequality over the long-run depends not only on the technology itself but also on the institutions and policies that are in place. 

The advent of computers and the Internet raised the relative productivity of higher skilled workers. Routine-intensive occupations that focused on predictable, easily-programmable tasks—such as switchboard operators, filing clerks, travel agents, and assembly line workers— were particularly vulnerable to replacement by new technologies. Some occupations were virtually eliminated and demand for others reduced. Research suggests that technological innovation over this period increased the productivity of those engaged in abstract thinking, creative tasks, and problem-solving and was therefore at least partially responsible for the substantial growth in jobs employing such traits. Shifting demand towards more skilled labor raised the relative pay of this group, contributing to rising inequality. AI is not a single technology, but rather a collection of technologies that are applied to specific tasks, the effects of AI will be felt unevenly through the economy. Some tasks will be more easily automated than others, and some jobs will be affected more than others—both negatively and positively. Some jobs may be automated away, while for others, AI-driven automation will make many workers more productive and increase demand for certain skills. Finally, new jobs are likely to be directly created in areas such as the development and supervision of AI as well as indirectly created in a range of areas throughout the economy as higher incomes lead to expanded demand. Recent research suggests that the effects of AI on the labor market in the near term will continue the trend that computerization and communication innovations have driven in recent decades. Researchers’ estimates on the scale of threatened jobs over the next decade or two range from 9 to 47 percent.

The report suggests three broad strategies for addressing the impacts of AI-driven automation across the whole U.S. economy:

  1. Invest in and develop AI for its many benefits;
  2. Educate and train Americans for jobs of the future; and
  3. Aid workers in the transition and empower workers to ensure broadly shared growth.
 

 

More Workplace Trends: Perks & Gig Economy Will slow Down

snapshotleatherpurple5_001

According to Glassdoor research sixty seven percent of U.S. employees said they were not likely to apply for a job at a company where men and women were paid unequally for the same work.

Boston Consulting Group says that by 2025, up to a quarter of jobs will be replaced by either smart software or robots, and a study from Oxford University reveals that 35% of existing U.K. jobs are at risk of automation in the next 20 years.

Tom Davenport and Julia Kirby have researched and wrote a book on this subject called Only Humans Need Apply: Winners and Losers In the Age of Smart Machines. Their bottom line is this: machines are less likely to displace entire jobs, but will more likely replace specific tasks and in the process will augment many jobs.

Jobs Will Be Impacted by Intelligent Technologies

.  Presently journalist can tap into algorithms from two firms called Narrative Science and Automated Insights, that use machine learning to write an article in a matter of seconds. The journalist then can focus on writing a more strategic view of the article. In other words, leverage the technology to do what it does best and re-frame the article to a more analytical level.

Wealth advisors are already seeing the power of Analytix Insights, a company that creates investment analytic narratives on more than 40,00 public companies.The job of a wealth advisor is already automated, the critical part of advising clients, establishing trust, and providing personalized expertise is the opportunity for wealth advisors to enhance their skill sets.

The proliferation of automated teller machines has actually led to slightly more bank tellers, due to both bank deregulation and job augmentation as bank tellers now reduce their time on cash handling responsibilities and can be trained to provide relationship based services to bank customers.

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: