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The United States Of America: Technology & Innovation

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The United States is a global leader in science and technology innovation and discovery. Americans invented the electric light bulb, photographic film, the machine gun, Third rail, Street light, skyscrapers, the airplane, mousetraps, the nuclear submarine, the laser printer, personal computers, the mobile phone and much more.

Over 19,000 American professionals, researchers, librarians, students etc. have contributed to an IGI Global publication, approximately 5,000 of them are associated with journals, while about 14,000 were involved in a book project. Of these esteemed contributors, over 250 will have their research featured in the upcoming Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology, Fourth Edition. Not only have American scholars provided significant contributions, but they also come from some of the most highly acclaimed institutions, including Harvard University, Columbia University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Princeton University, Yale University, Dartmouth University, Stanford University and over 5,000 total institutions across the United States.

IGI Global partners with all major US distributors, including Baker & Taylor, Ingram Content Group and EBSCO. IGI Global ebooks are available for purchase though GOBI Library Solutions, OASIS and hosted on popular platforms, such as ProQuest’s E-Book Central and Ebrary, as well as EBSCOHost.

Additionally, IGI Global’s InfoSci platform, favored by librarians and researchers, includes more than 3,900 books, 169 journals and 100 streaming videos. The award-winning platform also includes no DRM, unlimited simultaneous users, no platform or maintenance fees and full-text PDF and XML.

As a leader in innovation, IGI Global works closely with many US consortia. Following are select consortia that are also diverse regionally: NERL, PALCI, SCELC and Amigos.

View IGI Global research pertaining to the United States here, and check out select US titles below.

Gender Pay Gap Via State

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On average, a woman earns 21% less than her male counterpart. That gap can be larger or smaller depending on the state someone lives in. The biggest wage gap in the nation is in Louisiana. 21 states in the country currently have gender pay gaps that are larger than the national average. Washington, D.C. has the smallest pay gap at 10.4%, which means that women earn an average of 10.4% less than men in the area.

Women of color face the biggest pay gap when compared to white men

Image: Skye Gould/Business Insider

Black and Hispanic women are most affected by the wage gap, especially when compared to white men, who make up the largest demographic segment of the workforce, according to the Senate report.

Asian women face the smallest wage gap – they earn 84% of what white men earn, resulting in a pay gap of 16%. White women earn 75% of what white men do, while black women earn 65% and Hispanic women earn 55%.

The only income source through which women age 65 and up make nearly the same as what men over 65 make is Social Security.

Women with children are penalized, while men with children are rewarded

Image: Skye Gould/Business Insider

Image: Skye Gould/Business Inside

The Death Rate For Middle-Aged White Americans, On The Rise-Opioid Addiction

 

The death rate for middle-aged white Americans, particularly those who are undereducated, is on the rise due to the opioid epidemic .

Princeton Economists say the death rate for non-Hispanic, white Americans has been climbing since the late 90s. For decades, death rates (the number of deaths in a given population) have dropped for Americans overall, and middle-aged whites were no exception. Each year, on average, the death rate dropped by 2 percent.

However, in 1998, something flipped, and while the death rates for everyone else—including black, Hispanic, and Asian Americans—continued to steadily drop, the death rates for middle-aged white Americans start to creep up: 0.5 percent a year, every year:

As a result of  the high number of overdose and suicide deaths, economists, Anne Case and Angus Deaton, have now published a follow-up report where they’ve attempted to untangle the cause of this epidemic. While many experts supposed it’s linked to a worsening economy and lower incomes, Case and Deaton say their analysis shows it’s not so simple.

The story is rooted in the labor market, but involves many aspects of life, including health in childhood, marriage, child rearing, and religion,” the researchers reveal. “Although we do not see the supply of opioids as the fundamental factor, the prescription of opioids for chronic pain added fuel to the flames, making the epidemic much worse than it otherwise would have been.”

Opioid over prescription and addiction has been an increasing scourge in the US, killing 91 Americans every day, especially low-income white Americans, according to the Centers of Disease Control.

 

Internet Privacy & The Senate

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In a party-line 50-48 vote Thursday, senators approved a resolution to undo sweeping privacy rules adopted by the Obama-era Federal Communications Commission. If it becomes law, it would also prevent the FCC from setting similar rules again.

The rules have not gone into effect, however ISPs must tell consumers what information is being collected and how it is being used or shared. The rules require ISPs in some cases to get users’ explicit consent, for example to sell information such as geo location or browsing history for advertising.

Republicans in Congress and at the FCC have objected to these rules, passed by the Democratic majority at the FCC in October. They have argued with major cable and telcom companies,that the rules put ISPs on unequal footing with other major data-collecting companies like Google or Facebook, which are overseen instead by the Federal Trade Commission.

The Kremlin Denies It

 

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More On The Kremlin 

Declassified Report On Russia’s Election Hacking

 

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The FBI, CIA and NSA released their joint report on Friday afternoon.

Artificial Intelligence & Dubai Police Dept

 

In addition to its fleet of supercars, the Dubai Police are now enlisting the help of...

In addition to its fleet of supercars, the Dubai Police are now enlisting the help of Crime Prediction software(Credit: Abdullah AlBargan via Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0))

The Dubai Police department not only have luxury cars, they also have artificial intelligence crime prediction software.

The Dubai Police is the latest to have AI backup, in the form of Space Imaging Middle East’s (SIME) new Crime Prediction software.

SIME’s software is said to work like others already in use: machine learning algorithms are fed existing data and intelligence from police databases to identify patterns that human crime analysts might miss. The system can then use those patterns to determine where crime may be likely to occur next, and inform a police force where to best deploy officers and other resources. The idea isn’t just to go there and arrest suspicious-looking people, but to use a larger police presence in an area to deter crime from happening in the first place.

Does It Work? Police departments in various US cities have been using systems like Predpol, HunchLab and Series Finder for years, with mixed results and uneasy moral implications. After using HunchLab for 12 months, the St Louis County Police department expects a drop in this year’s crime statistics, but the results are hard to measure as a direct effect of predictive policing.

SIME hasn’t given many details on exactly how its system works or if it’s built to overcome some of these issues, but others like HunchLab are actively trying to be transparent about its inner workings.

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