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African American Hair Appears To Be A Problem With Video Games

Black character creator options in video games still have a long way to go

Source: Mic

Black players don’t get to look like themselves in video games.

Video game character customization isn’t exactly a new trend, but recent titles like Fallout 4NBA 2K17 and even newer Pokémon entries make it easier than ever to create a main character that looks just like you — they say it helps to have straight hair.?

Even when games get skin tone options right, the hair type and facial structure typically is ignored resulting accustom made black character that ends up looking more like a brown white person. See Here

Black character creator options in video games still have a long way to go

‘FIFA’ customization wins by a hairSource: Xavier Harding/Mic
Black character creator options in video games still have a long way to go

Dome afro, one of three black hairstyle options in ‘Mass Effect: Andromeda.’Source: Xavier Harding/BioWare

The Hair Obsession

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Break The Walls

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US haircare brand Shea Moisture, is tackling differences in the representation of white and black women… The US-based haircare brand’s ad features actresses, influencers and bloggers with natural hair explaining their experience of shopping for beauty products and the issues faced by Afro-American women: ‘There is a section called ethnic and there is an aisle called beauty’. The commercial concludes with a voiceover stating that ‘We are Shea Moisture, and we can now be found in the beauty aisle – where we all belong’.

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The nation’s first female, self-made millionaire made her fortune selling beauty and hair products she’d developed to African-American women, beginning in the early 1900s. Now a new line of products—Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture—is bringing her legacy to a new generation.

Historian A’Lelia Bundles, Walker’s great-great-granddaughter is very excited,

the product launch by Sundial Brands, is known for its SheaMoisture and Nubian Heritage lines. But instead of being available at drugstores such as CVS, Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture products will be sold exclusively at beauty giant Sephora and Sephora.com. The four-collection, 25-product line will be part of what the global market-research firm Mintel called in 2015the $2.7 billion black hair-care industry.

Walker was born Sarah Breedlove in 1867, the daughter of Louisiana sharecroppers. Widowed at the age of 20, Breedlove began losing her hair, and in 1905 she developed a system involving scalp preparation and lotions that revolutionized black hair care. She took the name Madam C.J. Walker after marrying her third husband, Charles Walker, and her treatment became known as the “Walker System.” She first sold her homemade products directly to African-American women. By 1910, when she moved from Pittsburgh to Indianapolis, Walker had a fleet of more than 3,000 workers who sold her product line of nearly 20 hair and skin items door to door and by mail order.

“Her immediate focus was growing hair,” said Bundles. “She created a system to cleanse hair more often in an era where many had no indoor plumbing and a lot of women were going bald. … Her initial product was a shampoo and ointment with sulfur. … The Walker System was meant to address hygiene and healthy hair and hair growth.”

Walker used her fortune to fund scholarships at the Tuskegee Institute and donated huge sums to the NAACP and the Black YMCA, among other charities. The charter of her company provided that only a woman could serve as president. When her daughter, A’Lelia, inherited Walker’s sumptuous New York City mansion, it became a gathering place for members of the Harlem Renaissance.

Walker died in 1919, but Sundial Brands CEO Richelieu Dennis is focused on continuing the legacy of this entrepreneur whose achievements he has always admired.

The Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture line will range in price from $24 to $32.

It’s clear that African-American hair care is big business. In its 2015 research report, Mintel noted that the market for black hair care products is up 7 percent since 2010. The report also found that products specifically targeted to black consumers are becoming more widely available as mainstream brands such as Revlon and L’Oreal develop products to address the specific needs of black buyers. Interestingly, as more women wear natural hairstyles, Mintel research shows that sales of relaxers have dropped 19 percent in the past two years.

 Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture line brings in two beauty breakthroughs: dual-encapsulation oil technology and a natural silicone alternative.

The Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture line launches at Sephora and Sephora.com on March 4.

 

 

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The nation’s first female, self-made millionaire made her fortune selling beauty and hair products she’d developed to African-American women, beginning in the early 1900s.

 Historian A’Lelia Bundles, Walker’s great-great-granddaughter is very excited about the launch  a new product called “This moment” launched by Sundial Brands, known for its SheaMoisture and Nubian Heritage lines. But instead of being available at drugstores such as CVS, Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture products will be sold exclusively at beauty giant Sephora and Sephora.com. The four-collection, 25-product line will be part of what the global market-research firm Mintel called in 2015 the $2.7 billion black hair-care industry.

“It is a statement to be in a place like Sephora,” Bundles said, and she is pleased that Sundial is the force behind the new line. “They have been wonderful about wanting to make sure that the legacy is part of the overall story that is going on.”

Walker was born Sarah Breedlove in 1867, the daughter of Louisiana sharecroppers. Widowed at the age of 20, Breedlove began losing her hair, and in 1905 she developed a system involving scalp preparation and lotions that revolutionized black hair care. She took the name Madam C.J. Walker after marrying her third husband, Charles Walker, and her treatment became known as the “Walker System.” She first sold her homemade products directly to African-American women. By 1910, when she moved from Pittsburgh to Indianapolis, Walker had a fleet of more than 3,000 workers who sold her product line of nearly 20 hair and skin items door to door and by mail order.

“Her immediate focus was growing hair,” said Bundles. “She created a system to cleanse hair more often in an era where many had no indoor plumbing and a lot of women were going bald. … Her initial product was a shampoo and ointment with sulfur. … The Walker System was meant to address hygiene and healthy hair and hair growth.”

Walker used her fortune to fund scholarships at the Tuskegee Institute and donated huge sums to the NAACP and the Black YMCA, among other charities. The charter of her company provided that only a woman could serve as president. When her daughter, A’Lelia, inherited Walker’s sumptuous New York City mansion, it became a gathering place for members of the Harlem Renaissance.

Walker died in 1919, however, Sundial Brands CEO Richelieu Dennis is focused on continuing the legacy of this entrepreneur whose achievements he has always admired.

The Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture line will range in price from $24 to $32, and while Dennis acknowledges that some might find that a little pricey, he said, “We feel that Madam Walker’s legacy is one of prestige, and one of pride.” He also says that selling it through Sephora aligns well because he sees the beauty firm as a globally recognized retailer of “prestige beauty.”

It’s clear that African-American hair care is big business. In its 2015 report, Mintel research noted that the market for black hair care products is up 7 percent since 2010. The report also found that products specifically targeted to black consumers are becoming more widely available as mainstream brands such as Revlon and L’Oreal develop products to address the specific needs of black buyers. Interestingly, as more women wear natural hairstyles, Mintel research shows that sales of relaxers have dropped 19 percent in the past two years.

Bundles says that the launch of the product line is even sweeter for her because it addresses all hair types. At 63, she says, she’s been through every possible hair journey.

“For my generation, having an Afro … we had one style, either a big blowout or a really short natural,” Bundles said. “Part of what I like about this collection is, there is something for every texture: locks, curly-kinky, wavy and heat-treated. … Now a younger generation is teaching all of us something about letting your hair speak for itself.”

The Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture line launches at Sephora and Sephora.com on March 4

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White Moms With Black Children & The Child’s Hair

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Lauren Casper says, doing her daughter’s hair is something she thought about even before she brought her baby home. Arsema, now 3, was four months old when Casper and her husband adopted her from Ethiopia.

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Serena Williams, Andreessen Horowitz Investing In Hair Company

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Hair is a $US 5 billion market in the United States. Market research from Mintel estimates six out of 10 black women wear a weave or a wig.

The hair goes through a process.Women in India sell their hair to buyers from China, who treat and package it, then sell it to primarily Korean distributors.Those distributors in turn, sell to Korean-owned beauty supply shops in the U.S., who then sell it to primarily African American women,” explained Ben Horowitz in a blog post, an investor from Andreessen Horowitz, who is leading a $US10 million investment round in Imira’s company,Mayvenn

Women who want hair extensions can’t typically walk into a salon and pick out the the hair they want, having to go to a beauty supply store instead.Imira said 95 per cent of African-American hair stylists can’t afford to keep the inventory on hand because of how expensive the natural hair is and the low amount of cash they have on hand to spend on it.This is where Mayvenn steps in. Mayvenn, which is Yiddish for trusted expert, lets hair stylists set up their own ecommerce sites and sell hair directly instead of referring customers to other beauty supply stores or distributors. The stylist doesn’t have to keep any of the hair on hand because Mayvenn ships it to them in two to three days, then offers a 30-day return window if the stylist or the client doesn’t like it.

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