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Posts tagged ‘Netflix’

Facebook Wants It All! Will Compete With Netflix and Amazon

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Facebook will follow the strategy of its (now) competitors, Netflix and Amazon, by paying and claiming ownership for scripted TV shows. The company will pay between $10,000 to $250,000 depending on the length of the shows, which can range anywhere from 5 to 30 minutes long. By 2020, 82 percent of consumer internet traffic will be video. Facebook says that creators will have free reign to stream and sell their content on external platforms after a set period of time. The option to go live on Facebook is still available for news publishers and personal users.

 

 

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DarkOverlord Demands Ransom For Unreleased Content From Netflix, Fox and Others

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Jojo Whilden/Netflix

‘TheDarkOverlord stole  next season’s Orange is The New Black content from a third party, and they’re demanding Netflix pay a ransom in order to keep the rest of the season private. Late Friday night, TheDarkOverlord tweeted about content belonging to ABC, FOX, IFC and National Geographic, saying “We’re not playing any games anymore.”

Torrent posted for stolen 'Orange is the New Black' premiere episode

The hackers claim Larson (from Larson studios in Hollywood) agreed to pay up but didn’t, and now they’re trying to squeeze Netflix.  Netflix has said “We are aware of the situation. A production vendor used by several major TV studios had its security compromised and the appropriate law enforcement authorities are involved.”

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TheDarkOverlord says that they have released episodes 2-10 of the 13 episode season in another torrent. They also continued to threaten Netflix and the other studios, saying “You’re going to lose a lot more money in all of this than what our modest offer was. We’re quite ashamed to breathe the same air as you. We figured a pragmatic business such as yourselves would see and understand the benefits of cooperating with a reasonable and merciful entity like ourselves. And to the others: there’s still time to save yourselves. Our offer(s) are still on the table – for now.”

Spike Lee To Direct She’s Gotta Have It Series For Netflix

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Netflix  ordered a 10-episode series of She’s Gotta Have It, which the company is a “contemporary update” to the original film. Lee will direct every episode, and executive produce alongside his wife, Tonya Lewis Lee.

As Deadline notes, the series was originally in development at Showtime in 2014, but never came to fruition. She’s Gotta Have It follows Nola Darling, a 20-something Brooklynite navigating the pitfalls of dating a trio of men. The original was shot in just 12 days on a very limited budget. Although details on the series version are scarce, one assumes it will be made with fewer restrictions. The project will be Lee’s first TV series.

Spike Lee To Direct Spike lee’s She’s Got To Have It Series For Netflix

Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

Thirty years ago, Spike Lee released his first feature film, She’s Gotta Have It, in 1986, and it’s on its way to a revival. Netflix has just ordered a 10-episode series of She’s Gotta Have It, which the company is framing as a “contemporary update” to the original film. Lee will direct every episode, and executive produce alongside his wife, Tonya Lewis Lee. The project will be Lee’s first TV series.

The Justice Dept Approves Purchase Of Time Warner Cable et al

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The U.S. Justice Department on Monday gave antitrust approval to Charter Communications Inc’s to purchase Time Warner Cable Inc and Bright House networks, which would create the second-largest U.S. broadband provider and third-largest video provider.

The Justice Department’s approval was met with certain conditions designed to protect competition, coming at a time when the pay television industry faces stagnation due to new competition from over-the-web rivals like Netflix and Hulu.  Charter agreed to refrain from telling its content providers that they cannot also sell shows online

Book Selling World Thats Rapid Changing

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Nearly three years ago, Liberty Media wanted to acquire Barnes & Noble. Now it appears that the media conglomerate has had enough and will sell most of its shares  in Barnes & Noble. In the meantime ,the number of businesses trying to muscle in on Barnes & Noble’s traditional territory, trying to reshape the relationship between book publishers, retailers and readers, is growing constantly.

Today a new breed of start-ups wants to turn book buyers into book consumers. Once, the two were analogous — unless,  trekked back and forth to your local public library to borrow books. Unlike movies, where rentals of VHS tapes and, later, of DVDs, had become standard by the 1980s, “renting” books never caught on as a business model. So while consumers have long gravitated to, say, Netflex as an alternative to a bricks and mortar Blockbuster store, the ability to send digitizedbooks to an e-book reader hasn’t been followed as rapidly by a “rental book” model.

Three companies are battling for readers and market share: Entitle Books, Scribd, and Oyster. you pay a flat fee and you can then download books from their library.

 

“It’s all about bringing in a new audience of readers, by bringing content to them on the devices they use,” he explains. Putting an array of 100,000 or so books at the fingertips of Oyster users on their Apple  iPads or iPhones and enabling them to sample at will — as many books as they choose at a flat fee of $9.95 a month — means that in aggregate these Oyster subscribers end up paying more than they would have otherwise to read books, and funneling more than they would have otherwise to the bottom lines of publishing companies. There are reasons to doubt that we’ll ever really have a “Netflix for books.” First, for most casual readers, the value of a monthly e-book subscription for $8.95 or $9.95 is less obvious than Netflix’s $7.99 rate for unlimited streaming. Also, we consume books differently than we do music or television or movies. That doesn’t mean that we don’t consume them digitally — simply that as readers, we seem to value retaining all kinds of different options.

Sales of e-books topped those in print” for the first time two years ago. They are still buying books, not just viewing them as downloads. And some of us are still mixing and matching: buying some from bookstores as hardcovers or paperbacks, selectively borrowing from libraries, choosing which books to add to e-readers and scrutinizing these new services to decide which might best fit our needs. It’s not a one-size-fits-all world — yet.

 

 

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