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Public Libraries Are Rocking This Summer

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Qatar Adds New Courses To It’s Master’s Degree In Library & Information Studies

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University College London Qatar (UCL Qatar) has announced the introduction of new courses within its postgraduate master’s degree of Library and Information Studies.
For the first time in Qatar, specialized courses in archives, records and data management will be taught. These will support the transition of Qatar to a knowledge-based economy and the development of the country’s growing need for library and information specialists.
The updates will help meet the growing need from across government and the private sectors to handle an ever-increasing amount of records, and to support the emerging research sector and e-government initiatives.
Trained data professionals in the sector will be able to manage and handle records from government agencies and private corporations, as well as the emerging research sector in the country.
The announcement comes just weeks after the official opening of the Qatar National Library that will now support Qatar’s innovative and research-based libraries sector to become a
regional leader.

Applications for UCL Qatar’s master’s degree programmes in Library and Information Studies and Museum and Gallery Practice are currently open at UCL Qatar. The degree programmes are available as full-time one year courses or part-time two years courses.

U.S. Public Schools Lost Approximately 20% Of Their Librarians Since 2000

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According to a new analysis of federal data, The United States can’t afford librarians. Between 1999-2000 and 2015-16, U.S. public schools lost 19% of full-time equivalent school librarians, according to a School Library Journal article by researcher Keith Curry Lance that examined National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) data.

The shortage in public school librarian employment  has not recovered since 2008. Districts serving minorities have been hit the hardest. Among all the districts that have retained all their librarians since 2005, 75% are white, Education Week reports. On the other end of the scale, student populations in the 20 districts that lost the most librarians in the same time comprised 78% students of color.

In essence, while U.S. employment rates are back up in the wake of the Great Recession, the public school librarian sector has not rebounded, and the nation’s collective failure to rebuild its public information infrastructure and minorities have been hit the hardest.

 

Some states suffered a more dramatic loss than the average. The number of librarians employed across Florida’s 67 school districts has dropped by 27% since just 2005, according to a 2017 Herald Tribune article, leaving several districts without any librarians at all. In replacement, the Herald Tribune argues, paraprofessionals run libraries as media aides — a position that requires just a high school diploma and a certification, and which starts at $14.60 an hour. Librarians with masters’ degrees, however, are often the first to go when budgets need to be cut.

Education Week’s articles also argues that librarian’s roles are being replaced by other, less qualified job titles: As public school librarians dwindled by 20%, schools saw an 11% rise in counselors, 19% boost in instructional aides, and a full 28% more school administrators.

 

Several recent studies have indicated that students suffer academically as a result: One nationwide study published in 2011 found signs that states’ 4th grade reading scores dropped in correlation with their loss of librarians. A 2012 Colorado-specific study from the same researchers then followed up, finding a similar correlation in the opposite direction: “Schools that either maintained or gained an endorsed librarian between 2005 and 2011 tended to have more students scoring advanced in reading in 2011 and to have increased their performance more than schools that either lost their librarians or never had one,” that study holds.

 

Librarians Are Baffled By Signed Truman Memoir

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Truman book

Truman book

Staff Photo Rod Aydelotte

A Waco High School librarian was weeding out old, little-read books from the stacks on Thursday when she paused at an autobiography of Harry S. Truman.

The librarian, Carri Nowak, opened to the title page of “Mr. Citizen” and saw the publication date: 1960. And under the title was an autograph that appeared to be from the former president himself.

She called the school district’s library specialist, Lisa Monthie, who at first thought she was saying a student had signed the book.

The librarian first thought was to weed the book.

That discovery led to a bit of sleuthing by Waco Independent School District officials. Monthie called Waco ISD social studies content specialist Robert Glinski, who contacted the director of the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum in Independence, Missouri. The museum confirmed the signature appeared to be written by hand, not mass-produced.

 

Signed memoirs by Truman are not exceedingly rare, though they are not commonplace either. Copies start at about $200 at online booksellers.

What was baffling was that such a prize book ended up in a high school library, with the front card showing it was being checked out as early as 1962.

 

The front card shows it was part of the collection of Richfield High School, which opened in 1961 at the current Waco High School campus at 2020 N. 42nd St. The schools merged in 1986.

The last few checkout dates do not include the year, but it appears that the book has not been checked out in more than 30 years.

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Truman
Harry S. Truman (left) was in Waco on October 12, 1960, with Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, center. At top right is Waco Congressman Bob Poage. Truman gave a stump speech for John F. Kennedy and denounced anti-Catholic sentiment.Truman Staff photo — John Bennett, file

Glinski is trying to discover if Truman signed the book when he visited Waco in October 1960, soon after the book was published.

In town for a tour supporting presidential candidate John F. Kennedy, Truman delivered a barn-burning speech against religious bigotry.

 

After spending the night at the downtown Roosevelt Hotel and having a steak dinner at the Masonic Grand Lodge of Texas, Truman headed to the Heart O’ Texas Coliseum for a speech in front of 5,000, the Tribune-Herald reported at the time. Along the way, he reminisced fondly of his previous visit to Waco as a sitting president in 1947, when he received an honorary doctorate from Baylor University.

 

At the coliseum, Truman chided Protestant preachers for telling their flocks not to vote for a Catholic candidate. He said he would have “exploded” if a Catholic priest “had stood up in church and said I ought not to be elected because I was a Baptist.” He said “religious bigotry is a regular earmark of a dictatorship.”

 

Meanwhile, the Waco Baptist Association met to pass a resolution reprimanding Truman for “his conduct and his manner of speech as a Christian, a Baptist and a guest in our midst.” The association also resolved to “encourage our churches and people consider seriously the men nominated for the presidency as to their allegiances other than to the Constitution of the United States.”

 

Libraries Awarded For Best Architectural Design

Laurel Branch Library, Largo, Md., designed by Grimm + Parker Architects (Photo: Sam Kittner via AIA

Photo: Nic Lehoux via AIA

Photo: Chuck Choi Photography via AIA

Photo: Chuck Choi Photography via AIA

Photo: Sam Kittner via AIA

Photo: Eric Staudenmaier via AIA

hoto: Lara Swimmer via AIA

 

National Library Lovers Day

National Library Lover's Month - February

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Tianjin China Library Defends Use Of Fake Books

The deputy director of the futuristic six-story library in the coastal city of Tianjin – designed by Dutch architectural firm MVRDV China has defended the building’s design. Reports about it went viral when it was revealed that many of its “books” were actually only images printed on the walls.

The library soon was the talk on the internet after photographs of its interior and white floor-to-ceiling bookshelves in the main entrance hall circulated on social media.

However, the euphoria was short lived with stories about its “fake books” soon making headlines around the world.

Tianjin Binhai Library, deputy director told Agence France-Presse that the mix-up was because authorities approved by the plan stating that the atrium would be used for circulation, sitting, reading and discussion, but omitted a request to store books on shelves. therefore they can only use the hall for the purposes for which it has been approved.

The library has about 200,000 books stored and hopes to house 1.2 million volumes in the future. About 15,000 visitors flocked to the library over the weekend

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