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Posts tagged ‘Hackers’

All Yahoo Account Were Hacked

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Three billion Yahoo accounts — including email, Tumblr, Fantasy, and Flickr — or three times as many as the company initially reported in 2016 were hacked.

Names, email addresses, and passwords, but not financial information, were breached, Yahoo said last year

The new disclosure comes four months after Verizon (VZ, Tech30) acquired Yahoo’s core internet assets for $4.48 billion. Yahoo is part of Verizon’s digital media company, which is called Oath.

Verizon revised the number of breached accounts to three billion after receiving new information.

“The company recently obtained new intelligence and now believes, following an investigation with the assistance of outside forensic experts, that all Yahoo user accounts were affected by the August 2013 theft,” Verizon said in a statement.

Verizon would not provide any information about who the outside forensics experts are.

Yahoo will send emails to the additional affected accounts. Following the hacking revelations last year, Yahoo required password changes and invalidated unencrypted security questions to protect user information.

According to experts, it’s not uncommon for forensic investigations to expose a greater number of victims than initial estimates.

 

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Whole Foods Had data breach That Potentially Compromised Its Customers’ Credit Card Details.

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Whole Foods said it was alerted to a potential breach after it “receiving information about an unauthorized access of payment card information. It appears  that Whole Foods did not detect the compromise itself, but was informed by a third party instead.

Stop Pirate & Others From Hijacking Your CPU To Mine Cryptocoins

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The good news is that it’s pretty easy to block the network that The Pirate Bay is using. The bad news is that you’ll need to know the specific URL for other networks.

Coin Hive is attempting to make a reliable mining service that’s simple for webmasters to set up. There are a few ways to block it. The fastest method is to just install No Coin in Chrome. The plug-in was recently put together by a programmer named Rafael Keramidas and for the moment, it only blocks Coin Hive.

But you may not even need a new plug-in because ad blocking software can do it, too. For AdBlock, you can find instructions for your specific browser and system here. Using Chrome as an example, you’d go to your list of extensions > find AdBlock and click options > click the customize tab at the top > click block an ad by its URL > in the text field that appears enter:

https://coin-hive.com/lib/coinhive.min.js

CBS’s Showtime Detected Mining Crypto-Coins In Viewers’ Web Browsers

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The websites of US telly giant CBS’s Showtime contained JavaScript that secretly commandeered viewers’ web browsers over the weekend to mine cryptocurrency.

The flagship Showtime.com and its instant-access ShowtimeAnytime.com sibling silently pulled in code that caused browsers to blow spare processor time calculating new Monero coins – an alternative to the Bitcoin. The hidden software typically consumed as much as 60 per cent of CPU capacity on computers visiting the sites. The scripts were written by Code Hive, a legit outfit that provides JavaScript to website owners: webmasters add the code to their pages so that they can earn slivers of cash from each visitor as an alternative to serving adverts to generate revenue. Over time, money mined by the Code-Hive-hosted scripts adds up and is transferred from Coin Hive to the site’s administrators. One Monero coin, 1 XMR, is worth about $92 right now.

They say  it’s extremely unlikely that a large corporation like CBS would smuggle such a piece of mining code onto its dot-coms – especially since it charges subscribers to watch the hit TV shows online – suggesting someone hacked the websites’ source code to insert the mining JavaScript and make a quick buck.

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Click to enlarge

Hackers Want 2.6 Million Or Else

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Equifax was hacked and they have information on 143 million Americans. The supposed hackers have made their demands of Equifax. The hackers are asking for over 600 Bitcoin – that much Bitcoin amounts to $2.66USD million. The hackers claim that if Equifax pay up , they will delete all of the data. Equifax has until September 15th to pay up.

The hackers have told Equifax to request any part of the stolen data and they will show it to them to prove that they’re legitimate.The hackers have given Equifax until September 15 to pay the ransom or the data will be publicized.

A proposed class-action lawsuit was filed against Equifax Inc. late Thursday evening, shortly after the company reported that an unprecedented hack had compromised the private information of about 143 million people.

A complaint was filed in Portland, Ore., federal court, users alleged Equifax was negligent in failing to protect consumer data, choosing to save money instead of spending on technical safeguards that could have stopped the attack. Data revealed included Social Security numbers, addresses, driver’s license data, and birth dates. Some credit card information was also put at risk.

Hacked Instagram Numbers On $ale

 

 

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Hackers established a searchable database named Doxagram allowing users to search for victims’ contact information for $10 per search. The hacker provided a list of 1,000 accounts they said were available for searching on Doxagram to the Daily Beast, and the list included most of the 50 most-followed accounts on the service.

 Doxagram was offline Friday @ 5:50 pm. It was unclear how or when it might come back. It’s also not known if Instagram would had sought to have the site shut down.

But even with the site shut down, contact information for dozens of celebrities now appears to be floating around on the dark web. A cybersecurity firm named RepKnight s found contact information for celebrities including:

  • Actors: Emma Watson, Emilia Clarke, Zac Efron, Leonardo DiCaprio, Channing Tatum.
  • Musicians: Harry Styles, Ellie Goulding, Victoria Beckham, Beyoncé, Lady Gaga and Rihanna, Taylor Swift, Katy Perry, Adele, Snoop Dogg, Britney Spears.
  • Athletes: Floyd Mayweather, Zinedine Zidane, Neymar, David Beckham, Ronaldinho.

For celebrities and other high-profile users, the hack could mean having to change a phone number, email address, or both. But it can also be used along with social engineering techniques to gain access to the account itself. That seems to be what happened to Gomez, Instagram’s most-followed user. Her account was briefly taken down Monday after it was used to post nude photographs of Justin Bieber, her ex-boyfriend.

 

 

Image: HBO

Episode 5 of the of Game of Thrones will air on Sunday. As with episode 4, an outline of the script has been circulating online in what seems to be the latest leak from the huge HBO hack. It seemed like a big deal at first. Nearly two weeks ago, HBO confirmed that hackers had penetrated its servers and stolen some “proprietary information.” A hacker who identifies himself as “Mr. Smith” then leaked the script outline for episode 4 of Game of Thrones, some episodes of Ballers, as well as some information about other HBO shows, like Room 104. At the time, the hacker claimed to have stolen some 1.5 terabytes of data, including information about HBO employees, and demanded a $6 million ransom. But HBO stood fast. Variety reported that the hacked data included the some emails of a senior HBO executive. The entertainment newspaper also claimed that there is an image file that “appears to show screenshots of HBO’s internal administration tools, listing employee names and email addresses and their functions within the organization.” That’s when comparisons to the catastrophic Sony hack of 2014 really heated up. If these hackers released a boatload of private and confidential information, and if the leaked data included financial information about the company, HBO could be in real trouble.

HBO corporate is now reassuring staff that their email inboxes were not implicated in the attack.

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