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Posts tagged ‘Facebook’

Facebook’s Portal

  •  Photo: Conrad Martin
Photo: Conrad Martin

Facebook recently announced the launch of Portal, its new smart home device for hands-free video calling.  Portal can track information like who you call, how frequently you call them and which apps you use — and that data could be used to serve you targeted ads on other platforms owned by the company.

2. In other security news, two new companies backed by SoftBank are teaming up to keep hackers from accessing your vulnerable smart home devices. (Think lightbulbs and thermostats.) Most devices that fall under the “Internet of Things” umbrella are notorious for flawed security, meaning hackers could use them to spread malware, access user data or gain control remotely.

Instagram Will Use Artificial Intelligence To Detect bullying In Photos

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Although the majority of photos shared on Instagram are positive and bring people joy, occasionally a photo is shared that is unkind or unwelcome,” Adam Mosseri, the new head of Instagram, said in a press release. “We are now using machine learning technology to proactively detect bullying in photos and their captions and send them to our Community Operations team to review.”

Instagram’s parent company, Facebook, also introduced its own anti-bullying tools this month. Those features allow users to remove “troll comments” from their feeds, with the options to delete or hide comments in “bulk” and report comments on behalf of the victim. Facebook has hired thousands of people to look over content that may run afoul of its rules.

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Facebook Takes Down Over Six Hundred Accounts Linked To Russia & Iran

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The majority of the fake accounts appear to be linked to Iran, with some also said to be based in Russia. Twitter said that it has suspended 284 accounts.

Facebook said that it had identified 652 cases. They removed 652 Pages, groups and accounts for coordinated inauthentic behavior that originated in Iran and targeted people across multiple internet services in the Middle East, Latin America, UK and US

The company credited cybersecurity firm FireEye for helping to identify a network known as ‘Liberty Front Press’ which appeared to be behind the campaign.

Facebook said that it had been monitoring some of the accounts for several months, and had deliberately delayed removal. The reason for the delay was because it would have been harder to understand their playbook and the extent of their network. It also limits their ability to coordinate with law enforcement, who often have investigations of their own. Thats why they’ve investigated some of these campaigns for many months and why they will continue working to find out more.

Twitter recently came under fire for taking a very long time to respond to hate speech by Alex Jones. Facebook recently started making two-factor authentication a requirement for some page managers to help verify their identity.

State-sponsored fake news is believed to have played a role in influencing both the US presidential election and the UK’s Brexit referendum.

Connections between suspected Iran-linked 'inauthentic'  websites and social media

Facebook Developing A Dating App?

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had announced that they are indeed looking at developing a dating feature. Note, it won’t be a standalone app but introduced as a feature within Facebook, however it would be an optional feature for users. Facebook has begun testing the app within its employees. According to reports, the company has asked its employees to try the feature (of course, it’s optional) to test the end-to-end product experience for bugs and confusing UI (user interface).

Facebook Testing Subscription Groups

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Facebook is starting to let Group admins charge $4.99 to $29.99 per month for access to special sub-Groups full of exclusive posts. A hand-picked array of parenting, cooking and “organize my home” Groups will be the first to get the chance to start a subscription Group open to their members.

Facebook is piloting subscriptions with a small number of groups to continue to support group admins who lead these communities.

 Group admins are looking for ways to help them earn money to deepen engagement with their members and continue to support their communities. Many admins do this today by creating an additional subscribers-only group that sits alongside their existing group, and rely on additional tools to track and collect payments

For example, Sarah Mueller’s Declutter My Home Group is launching a $14.99 per month Organize My Home subscription Group that will teach members how to stay tidy with checklists and video guides. The Grown and Flown Parents group is spawning a College Admissions and Affordability subscription group with access to college counselors for $29.99. Cooking On A Budget: Recipes & Meal Planning will launch a $9.99 Meal Planning Central Premium subscription group with weekly meal plans, shopping lists for different grocery stores and more

Instagram’s New IGTV Competing With You Tube

 

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Video will be available through Instagram or a new app called IGTV. The initiative comes as parent company Facebook struggles to attract teens.  Instagram Chief Executive Kevin Systrom said he hopes IGTV will become as a hub of creativity for relative unknowns who turn into internet sensations with fervent followings among teens and young adults.

YouTube now has 1.8 billion users.Instagram, which Facebook bought for $1 billion six years ago, now has 1 billion users, up from 800 million nine months ago.More importantly, 72% of U.S. children ages 13 to 17 use Instagram, second to YouTube at 85%, according to the Pew Research Center. Only 51% of kids in that group now use Facebook, down from 71% from a similar Pew survey in 2014-15.

 

Facebook’s Bug Made Private Posts Public

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Facebook recently announced that a bug made the posts of 14 million users public without their knowledge. A small software bug with big consequences. When you make a post to Facebook, it always asks who should see the post: your posts can be public, only visible to friends, only visible to certain friends, or only visible to you. Usually, Facebook remembers whatever you last set this to, automatically publishing your posts to the same audience you did last time. This bug caused the setting to default to posting publicly, many Facebook users probably didn’t notice.

Although you could still manually change the setting so anything you posted was private, you would have to notice that the default had changed. And since no one knew Facebook was making privacy changes, it was easy to miss. That means you could have made some of your private thoughts public.

The issue only affected posts from May 18 to May 27, 2018, and didn’t affect posts made before or after. But that’s was still enough time for 14 million users to have made public posts — some of which were surely unintentional.

It’s a good idea to browse through your profile and make sure no posts in May were accidentally made public.

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