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Posts tagged ‘New York City’

New York City Landlords Getting Graded Like Restaurants With New Technology

 

 

Letter grades are no longer just for restaurants, as tech start-up Rentlogic is now slapping letter grades of its own on the dwellings you call home.

Rentlogic’s service hopes to make sure you can get that info too. The program provides A through F letter grades for residential buildings in NYC based on eight years’ worth of open source data from government agencies. The data includes past issues that may have afflicted the property such as mold, legal actions against the landlord and rodents.

The browser extension will let you access the data while browsing real estate listings online. An A through F letter grade for the building will pop up in a box and works in conjunction with more than 200 different rental listing sites, including the popular ones like Zillow and Truila.

The software works as a browser extension, so you’ll have to download it ontoFirefox with just two clicks and peruse the web with a little more knowledge at your fingertips.

 

 

 

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The Mayor’s Plan On New York City Jobs

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Comdey Central’s The Daily Show Opening Donald Trump Twitter Library For 2 Days; Whats Next?

 

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The pop up library is scheduled to open this Friday @ 3 West 57th Street near Fifth Avenue, a few blocks from Trump Tower,  admission is free and open to the public between 11 AM-7 PM ET. The library will exist only for a weekend. The pop-up library in Manhattan will  close Sunday

It will contain several exhibits, including a short documentary about Trump’s Twitter usage and a video retrospective called “Sad!” that “will solemnly display a collection of people, places and things that the President has deemed ‘SAD!’”

 

It is SO SAD & SHAMEFUL how some can JOKINGLY  take politics and politicians only to incite humor or even danger in this day and age when there is so much turmoil and power hungry leaders worldwide SHAMEFUL with everybody across the globe watching ONLY IN NEW YORK!

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New Yorks City’s Subway System Has A Collaboration With The City’s Libraries

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All images via NYPL

Going on a lengthy commute? well the New York Public Library has got you covered. In collaboration with the MTA, New York State, TransitWireless and the Queens and Brooklyn Public Libraries, NYPL is bringing us the “Subway Library,” a platform that provides commuters with access to free e-books, short stories and more—whether you’re above or below ground.

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No More Black Harlem!

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Black residents have been present in Harlem continually since the 1630s, and as the neighborhood modernized in the late 19th century, they could be found especially in the area around 125th Street and in the “Negro tenements” on West 130th Street. By 1900, tens of thousands lived in Harlem. The mass migration of blacks into the area began in 1904, due to another real estate crash, the worsening of conditions for blacks elsewhere in the city, and the leadership of black real estate entrepreneurs including Phillip Payton, Jr. After the collapse of the 1890s, new speculation and construction started up again in 1903 and the resulting glut of housing led to a crash in values in 1904 and 1905 that eclipsed the late-19th century slowdown. Landlords could not find white renters for their properties, so Philip Payton stepped in to bring blacks. His company, the Afro-American Realty Company, has been credited with the migration of blacks from their previous neighborhoods, the Tenderloin, San Juan Hill (now the site of Lincoln Center), Minetta Lane in Greenwich Village and Hell’s Kitchen in the west 40s and 50s.[42][43] The move to northern Manhattan was driven in part by fears that anti-black riots such as those that had occurred in the Tenderloin in 1900 and in San Juan Hill in 1905 might recur. In addition, a number of tenements that had been occupied by blacks in the west 30s were destroyed at this time to make way for the construction of the original Penn Station.

In 1907, black churches began to move uptown. Several congregations built grand new church buildings, including St Philip’son West 134th Street just west of Seventh Avenue (the wealthiest church in Harlem), the Abyssinian Baptist Church on West 138th Street and St Mark’s Methodist Church on Edgecombe Avenue. More often churches purchased buildings from white congregations of Christians and Jews whose members had left the neighborhood, including Metropolitan Baptist Church on West 128th and Seventh Avenue, St James Presbyterian Church on West 141st Street, and Mt Olivet Baptist Church on Lenox Avenue.  Only the Catholic Church retained its churches in Harlem, with white priests presiding over parishes that retained significant numbers of whites until the 1930s.

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MTA Committee Vote On Testing New Technology That Alerts Train Crew When Someone Is On The Tracks

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A transit authority committee voted Monday to move forward with a $2 million test of track intrusion technology.

Subway tunnels would be outfitted with strobe lights that notify operators when someone or something is on the tracks.

 

New York City’s Cultural Future

Brooklyn Borough-Wide Workshop. Image courtesy of Hester Street Collaborative and Create NYC

Queens Borough-Wide Workshop. Image courtesy of Hester Street Collaborative and Create NYC.

New York City’s Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA)a report detailing the results of roughly seven months of public engagement conducted in the lead up to the city’s forthcoming cultural plan. The agency engaged 188,000 New Yorkers—via focus groups, phone surveys, and hundreds of community events—in order to compile its brief.

The plan’s website Residents are also invited to provide in-person feedback at city-wide events through May 31st. DCLA commissioner Tom Finkelpearl says The responses will be “data points,” used to further refine the city’s first-ever cultural plan.

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