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Research economists Fear Automated, Self-Driving Vehicles Will Have A Negative Impact

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Research economists fear that automated, self-driving vehicles will have a negative impact on those that are deeply tied to traditional transportation business models and practices.

There are 1.7 million professional truck drivers in the United States and an additional 1.7 million operators of other commercial land vehicles. Policymakers must prepare for the possible elimination of many of these jobs.

The Center For The Future of Work intends to address the challenge by bringing economic expertise together with some of the world’s leaders in autonomous vehicle technology to forecast where and when these individuals might be displaced from their current jobs. With necessary data, they can begin to design policies that could better improve the dislocation of these workers, and have these policies in place before the disruptions emerge. A Heinz College student team is currently collaborating with the New America Foundation to create the first draft of a map in space and time that forecasts the potentially significant job losses associated with the commercial deployment of these technologies.

 

Hybrid truck and blue electric car on wireless charging lane

 

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Ford Designs A Baby Crib That Feels Like A Car Ride

 

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It’s dubbed the Max Motor Dreams, and it’s actually a “smart bed” for babies that can simulate the feel of riding in a car — a well-known trick for parents with babies that have difficulty falling asleep. It uses sound, lighting, and motion to mimic the feel of a gentle car ride from the backseat. Ford is running a contest in Spain where one lucky person to test drive the Ford Max vehicle can walk away with the baby bed. Now we just need to hope they smarten up and make an adult-sized version.

 

Google’s Waze

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After a successful run in San Francisco, Google Waze is heading to other cities.The rollout will  have Waze  competing against the likes of ride-sharing giants Uber and Lyft, both of whom already offer carpooling options — UberPool and Lyft Line.

Waze’s system allows drivers to make up to two rides a day — for example, to and from work — and riders pay to cover the cost of gas, plus a little extra.

The downside? A Carpool user has to request a shared ride several hours ahead of time, and then hope someone responds. If no one does, you can always jump in an Uber or Lyft.

With both Uber and Google continuing to make progress with their respective autonomous cars, it may not be too long before empty cars are driving up to collect passengers, giving both companies additional options over the kind of transportation services they offer.

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Dutch company PAL-V is now taking orders for the world’s first commercial flying car, the Liberty. The company says that the Liberty models are fully compliant with safety regulations set by global governing bodies, and that deliveries will begin by the end of 2018.

The first 90 copies are designated as Pioneer Editions, boasting special exterior and interior details. For the personalized touch and additional standard features such as power heating, buyers will have to pay $599,000. After the Pioneer Edition sells out, PAL-V will start selling the standard model, known as the Liberty Sport, for $399,000.

Buyers should have a license for both driving and flying. On the road, the Liberty can lower its suspension and make use of its tilting cockpit for better maneuverability. PAL-V lists top speed on the road as 100 mph, while 0-62 mph is estimated to take less than 9 seconds. In the air, it can travel at up to 112 mph.

 

The AAA Tipsy Tow Program

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The AAA Tipsy Tow program will offer free tows to drinking drivers on Super Bowl Sunday. The service will provide a one-way ride for drivers and their vehicle to the home from 6 p.m. Sunday to 6 a.m. Monday. Drivers can call 800-222-4357 (AAA-HELP) for a free tow home of up to 10 miles. Tipsy Tow doesn’t take reservations.

Driverless Cars Not Ready to Become Driverless

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A report released by the DMV Wednesday reveals that driverless cars have a long way to go before they can actually become driverless.

The data from the Department of Motor Vehicles includes autonomous vehicle test results from 11 companies. The information includes details of when drivers had to take control of the cars, either because the test driver felt uncomfortable or due to a glitch in the technology. The data only includes miles traveled on public roads in California, and doesn’t include testing at private facilities or outside the state.

Bryant Walker Smith, scholar for Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society says”there are more questions that need answers; such as what would happen if the driver didn’t intervene. Would the car know to pull to the side of the road to avoid a collision? how ‘bad’ the hypothetical outcome avoided by a driver-initiated disengagement needs to be for Waymo (for example) to include such a disengagement in its count,” he said. “In other words, if the driver hadn’t intervened in any given instance, would a crash have necessarily resulted?”

Delphi Automotive Systems, for example, reported several instances where the cars could not read traffic signals due to “poor sun conditions,” or when the cars had trouble changing lanes during heavy traffic. Google’s Waymo, on the other hand, said the human drivers had to take over most often due to software discrepancies, followed by an unwanted maneuver of the car or the reckless behavior of another driver. Other times, humans took over because there was heavy pedestrian traffic or out of extra caution for a cyclist sharing the road.

Honda and Volkswagon — said they never tested the vehicles on public roads. The others ranged from 530 miles logged by Tesla during only one month in 2016 to the 635,868 miles traveled by Google’s Waymo vehicles.

The fastest Cars In History 1946-Present

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Here’s a detailed look at the last seven decades of the world’s fastest production cars – from 1946 until now.

More here

 

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