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Gen Z & the Workforce

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Gen Z is entering the workforce at a rapid pace, with the eldest of them now 23. A far larger group than their millennial counterparts, youth and young adults born between the mid-1990s and late 2000s have aptly been named Gen Z. Employers should be excited as a flood of talent will be joining the workforce soon — comprising 36 percent of the workforce by 2020 — but be aware, they have short attention spans, even shorter than millennials, and expect a lot from their employers.

According to a Deloitte study, Gen Z values employment that allows them to live a balanced lifestyle even more so than Millennials, with a greater emphasis on physical, mental and social well-being. They want flexibility and control within their schedules. For example, they want to be able to go to an afternoon doctor’s appointment without feeling like it reflects poorly on their work ethic. Employers must investigate providing flexible work hours, the ability to work from home when possible, and progressive benefit plans that include a Wellness Spending Account. Shopify, for example, offers a WSA that includes eligible spending categories such as gym memberships, financial planners and house cleaning.

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With this massive influx of new talent, the workplace is once again going to experience significant change.

Growing up with the Internet, teens are used to getting real-time feedback—and lots of it. Their education and co-curricular activities have also made them used to receiving constructive criticism and acting upon it to improve their chances of success.

“The big thing for employers to consider is that Gen Z actually wants to be mentored and managed,” says Tom Turpin, president of employment agency Randstad. “Gen Z places a tremendous amount of value on an employer’s ability to mentor and teach them.”

Gen Z, people born in 1995 and later, are protesters, social-justice marchers, and spendthrifts just like their hippie aunts, uncles, parents and even grandparents.

Demographers may debate the exact dates, but Baby Boomers were typically born between 1946 and 1964. Their parents grew up during the Depression and the nightly news brought into their living rooms images of a war fought in Southeast Asia.

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Compare that with Generation Z. Some of the first Gen Zers were teens and adolescents during the Great Recession of 2008. They saw their parents or the parents of their friends struggle with foreclosures and joblessness. Meanwhile, the country was waging a War on Terror against a nationless enemy.

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Are Gen Z and millennials ignoring you?

Gen Y versus Gen Z

Gen X versus Gen Y versus Gen Z - differences in the workplace

Traditional marketing doesn’t work for Gen Z. Marketers need to embrace technology and new ways of storytelling. According to an infographic from Upfront Analytics, Gen Z customers respond to edgy and visual marketing tactics. Videos—especially short ones like those created via the social network Vine—work particularly well with young customers.

How to market to the Gen Z teenager

The study revealed that 80 percent of Gen Z say finding themselves creatively is important. Over 25 percent post original video on a weekly basis, while 65 percent enjoy creating and sharing content on social media.

Generation Z are culture creators

 

Concerns about Wearable Health Devices Creating Hypochondriacs

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The ‘worried well’ will be sent into hyperdrive. There may be an influx of patients with potentially valid concerns about their risk of falling ill in the future.”There is unfortunately the danger that the unscrupulous of our profession could prey on the fears of patients, convincing them that treatment is necessary, where it is not.”

Apple has launched the latest version of the Apple Watch, which is one of the first mainstream devices available to consumers that can carry out ECG tests and detect a number of heart conditions, such as a low heart rate or arrhythmic beating. apple watch 4

 

Best Places for Women Entrepreneurs

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Top Places for Women Entrepreneurs

Rank Metro Final Score Business Income for Women Compared to Women’s Earnings in Metro Women in Business % of Businesses Owned by Women
Median Average Median Average % of Women Workers Who Are Self-Employed % of Self-Employed Women Who Are Incorporated Self-Employed Incorporated
1 San Francisco 80.5 $10,378 $31,880 17.6% 41.8% 10.6% 20.8% 41.7% 32.1%
2 Austin, Texas 72.2 $8,262 $25,345 19.6% 48.1% 9.0% 24.9% 38.6% 30.1%
3 San Jose, Calif. 67 $7,657 $30,334 12.6% 38.8% 8.3% 22.7% 41.1% 32.2%
4 Memphis, Tenn. 65 $9,068 $20,399 24.9% 45.5% 5.6% 27.0% 35.1% 29.8%
5 Nashville, Tenn. 64.8 $8,866 $23,373 22.9% 49.0% 7.1% 20.1% 34.9% 27.4%
6 Los Angeles 63.7 $7,758 $20,945 18.6% 37.4% 10.9% 24.8% 37.9% 30.7%
7 San Diego 63.6 $8,060 $20,949 18.5% 37.8% 10.0% 24.2% 39.3% 30.2%
8 Sacramento, Calif. 61.6 $7,053 $23,596 15.0% 41.0% 8.4% 21.1% 39.1% 31.9%
9 Seattle 57.6 $4,534 $22,713 9.2% 37.0% 8.6% 30.6% 42.1% 32.7%
10 Cincinnati 56.9 $7,556 $21,432 18.6% 42.2% 5.4% 29.1% 35.4% 28.5%
11 Raleigh, N.C. 56.3 $3,526 $23,664 8.1% 44.0% 7.4% 36.7% 38.4% 31.4%
12 Boston 54.7 $8,060 $22,574 15.3% 33.8% 7.0% 24.3% 39.0% 28.3%
13 Las Vegas 54.3 $5,037 $17,566 13.8% 38.5% 6.6% 30.6% 39.6% 33.4%
14 Washington 53.4 $5,037 $23,448 8.6% 32.7% 7.2% 31.3% 41.4% 32.1%
15 Portland, Ore. 52.9 $4,030 $17,389 9.3% 31.7% 10.2% 29.8% 42.5% 33.8%
16 Denver 52.5 $3,022 $19,820 6.6% 35.0% 9.1% 37.3% 40.4% 33.6%
17 Houston 52 $7,254 $19,029 17.7% 36.3% 7.7% 23.5% 36.0% 28.3%
18 Hartford, Conn. 48.2 $8,060 $22,710 15.8% 37.1% 5.8% 25.1% 34.1% 24.2%
19 Phoenix 47 $4,534 $16,352 11.5% 33.5% 7.9% 31.8% 37.5% 31.5%
20 Providence, R.I. 46.2 $7,053 $18,161 16.1% 33.9% 5.5% 28.8% 34.9% 27.7%
21 New Orleans 46.1 $6,045 $13,475 16.7% 29.8% 7.7% 34.5% 34.9% 30.2%
22 Dallas 45.7 $5,037 $17,407 12.2% 33.9% 7.5% 26.5% 37.2% 30.4%
23 Kansas City, Mo. 45.4 $3,627 $18,160 9.0% 37.3% 6.6% 30.8% 38.2% 31.0%
24 New York 44.6 $5,037 $20,053 10.0% 31.1% 7.6% 32.0% 36.8% 28.2%
24 Baltimore 44.6 $4,937 $17,227 9.8% 28.4% 6.2% 34.2% 39.2% 31.9%
26 Riverside, Calif. 44.5 $5,037 $16,373 13.3% 34.4% 7.9% 23.7% 35.6% 30.6%
27 Miami 43.3 $3,526 $13,004 9.9% 28.8% 10.7% 39.4% 36.5% 29.6%
28 Columbus, Ohio 42.6 $3,022 $22,010 7.3% 43.5% 5.6% 26.6% 36.3% 27.8%
29 Minneapolis 42.3 $4,332 $18,113 9.2% 31.1% 6.8% 34.0% 37.9% 28.7%
30 Milwaukee 40.9 $4,030 $18,281 9.6% 35.6% 5.0% 34.0% 35.8% 28.8%
31 San Antonio 40.3 $4,030 $16,246 11.2% 36.5% 6.5% 24.7% 35.4% 30.0%
32 Atlanta 40.1 $3,022 $15,809 7.3% 30.6% 7.7% 37.4% 36.6% 30.7%
33 Tampa, Fla. 39.6 $3,022 $13,931 8.0% 29.3% 7.7% 42.8% 36.1% 30.2%
34 Charlotte, N.C. 37.8 $4,030 $13,470 10.4% 27.1% 6.6% 35.2% 36.6% 30.7%
35 Orlando, Fla. 35.3 $1,007 $13,833 2.9% 31.3% 7.5% 43.3% 36.8% 31.2%
36 Richmond, Va. 34.6 $1,813 $15,257 4.3% 29.2% 6.1% 33.7% 39.2% 31.8%
37 Salt Lake City 34.3 $2,518 $15,600 6.8% 34.4% 7.0% 30.9% 37.2% 26.2%
38 Oklahoma City 33.6 $2,015 $14,189 5.7% 32.6% 7.7% 32.6% 35.8% 29.2%
39 Virginia Beach, Va. 33.2 $2,317 $12,850 6.1% 27.7% 5.8% 32.9% 39.5% 31.6%
40 Jacksonville, Fla. 32.4 $1,511 $14,078 4.0% 30.3% 6.8% 39.2% 36.6% 29.5%
41 Buffalo, N.Y. 31.5 $5,037 $14,594 12.3% 29.8% 4.7% 28.8% 34.2% 25.2%
42 St. Louis 30.2 $2,015 $13,673 5.0% 27.7% 5.8% 33.5% 36.9% 30.9%
43 Chicago 30 $2,015 $14,622 4.5% 25.8% 6.3% 37.8% 36.3% 29.4%
44 Birmingham, Ala. 28.8 $2,015 $16,139 5.3% 35.8% 5.7% 31.6% 33.1%

Automation & Millennials, Gen Xers, & Baby Boomers In The Workforce

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51% of Millennials report using online/cloud-based tools for word processing/spreadsheets compared to 33% of Boomers. Use of collaboration tools such as Slack, Dropbox etc. is higher among younger workers. Millennials are also looking for the faster implementation of new technologies and improved collaboration tools. Older employees want more of a focus on making existing technology more user-friendly. Roughly half (46%) described their employer as either “cutting edge” or in the “upper tier” in use of IT, while 41% put their companies somewhere in the middle of the adoption curve.

Across generations, men were likely to consider technology more of a significant factor. However, this difference is less pronounced among Millennials. The difference between Millennial men and women when it comes to significance of technology in choosing a potential employer is 12 percentage points compared to 23 percentage points between Gen X men and women.

Role of technology in shaping views of employers

In terms of device usage, younger workers tend to use smart phones/mobile apps for work purposes more than older workers – 61% of Millennials, and 54% of Gen X say they use their smartphones frequently for work when compared to 38% of Boomers.

In terms of applications used, the use of online/cloud based applications is higher among Millennials. Also, the gender gap seen with regard to significance of technology is not reflected in the actual usage of applications noted below among Millennial men and women.

Application usage  in the workplace

The Millennial generation is now the largest generation and accounts for 35% of the workforce, according to data from Pew Research Center. As of 2017, there were 56 million Millennials, 53 million Gen Xers, and 41 million Baby Boomers. Millennials surpassed the number of Gen Xers in 2016. Even though the composition of the workforce is quite heterogenous there are commonalities – CompTIA research found that the majority of workers (54%) are where they expect to be with regard to their careers. There were also similarities when it comes to long-term career aspirations or goals. Across generations, employees are looking for financial security and rewarding work that provides some sort of work/life balance.

Top career aspirations

Apple & Google Pay @ 7- Eleven Stores

 

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As long as you have a compatible smartphone or smartwatch, you’ll be able to simply tap your device on the store’s reader when you go to pay for your goods.

Support for Apple Pay and Google Pay is rolling out at the majority of 7-Eleven’s U.S. stores throughout September, adding to the company’s other mobile payment options that also include Samsung Pay.

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The UPS TentativeDeal

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A tentative deal for a new labor contract between UPS and the Teamsters union creates a new category of drivers to handle weekend shifts, as the increase in online shopping prompts increased demand for deliveries on the weekends.

The deal also calls for the company to review technological changes with the union six months before rolling out changes, such as the deployment of delivery drones, driverless vehicles or some other innovation, according to a document on the deal released by the Teamsters on Tuesday.

Microsoft Working On Tech To Eliminate Cashiers in Stores Like Walmart

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Microsoft is reportedly working on technology that will eliminate cashiers and checkout lines in stores, similar to Amazon’s technology already implemented in its Amazon Go brick-and-mortar store.

According to the report, Microsoft’s technology tracks which items customers put into their carts. While it’s unclear how far along Microsoft is in developing this technology, the company has reportedly shown sample tech to potential partners and has even talked to Walmart about implementing it.

The exact technology used in Microsoft’s service isn’t explained, but it may be linked to the company’s new Kinect for Azure project. Detailed at Microsoft Build last month, this project builds on Kinect’s current abilities and includes integrated computing power and a sensor package with a depth-mapping camera. It can be used to execute spatial mapping and motion tracking, which could come in handy when tracking customers’ hands as they reach for items on shelves.

Microsoft’s store tech is designed to help retailers “keep pace” with Amazon as the online shopping giant dabbles more in brick-and-mortar endeavors. Specifically, retailers who may use Microsoft’s technology could better compete with Amazon Go, the company’s cashier less convenience store.

Though, it’s unclear when Microsoft will roll out a final version of its checkout-free retail technology or if the project will be scrapped completely

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