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Archive for the ‘Movies’ Category

Stream A Movie With Your Library Card

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  • You’ll need to go to nypl.kanopystreaming.com, or bklynlibrary.kanopystreaming.com, or access the site via the Library’s Articles & Databases page.
  • You will need to create a sign-in, and then punch in your library card number and PIN.
  • You can view up to 10 movies per month with an NYPL card, and 6 per month with a BPL card.
  • Once started, you will have three days to watch each movie.
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Appropriations Committee Voted To Approve Funding for Libraries

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The full House Appropriations Committee voted to approve FY2018 funding for libraries. By a 28-22 margin, the committee approved the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education (LHHS) funding bill, which proposes roughly $231 million for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)—including $183.6 million for Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) programs, and $27 million for the Department of Education’s Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) program—essentially at 2017 funding levels.

In addition to saving the IMLS, the LHHS bill includes level funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. However, it funds the Department of Education (DOE) at $66 billion—a cut of $2.4 billion from 2017, which includes the elimination of some important library-related programs, including the DOE’s Striving Readers program. ALA officials said they would work to restore it.

Meanwhile, on July 18, the House Appropriations Committee approved by a 30-21 margin the FY2018 Interior and Environment Appropriations, which includes $145 million each for the NEH and the NEA, roughly equal to FY 2017 funding levels.

The key votes come after President Trump’s call  in May to eliminate IMLS and virtually all federal funding for libraries, as well as a host of other vital programs and agencies, including the NEH and the NEA. And, it comes after Congress, earlier in May, passed a belated 2017 budget that actually upped the IMLS, NEH, and NEA budgets.

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Black Panther has T’Challa returning home to Wakanda after the events of Captain America: Civil War to take his place on the powerful nation’s throne. His return is met with trouble, however, in the form of competing factions challenging his rule and a dangerous enemy from his past. He must prove that he has the wisdom and strength to serve as both the king of Wakanda and its protector, the Black Panther.

Black Panther is scheduled to hit theaters February 16, 2018

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Facebook Wants It All! Will Compete With Netflix and Amazon

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Facebook will follow the strategy of its (now) competitors, Netflix and Amazon, by paying and claiming ownership for scripted TV shows. The company will pay between $10,000 to $250,000 depending on the length of the shows, which can range anywhere from 5 to 30 minutes long. By 2020, 82 percent of consumer internet traffic will be video. Facebook says that creators will have free reign to stream and sell their content on external platforms after a set period of time. The option to go live on Facebook is still available for news publishers and personal users.

 

 

Facebook TV Coming Mid-June

Photo: Getty

Facebook is planning to launch around two dozen original “TV-like” programs in mid-June. It appears that Facebook is looking to follow Amazon, Hulu, and Netflix. More competition folks.

They are saying that the social network has been looking for shows in two distinct tiers: a marquee tier for a few longer, big-budget shows that would feel at home on TV, and a lower tier for shorter, less expensive shows of about five to 10 minutes that would refresh every 24 hours.

 

The new video initiative means Facebook would play a much more hands-on role in controlling the content that appears on its social network with nearly 2 billion members — and it comes as companies like Amazon, YouTube, and Snap are locked in an arms race to secure premium video programming.

German Court Rules for Illegal Downloading- Parents Must Name Their Child Or Else

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A German court has ruled on a 2011 copyright infringement case and the verdict has disturbing consequences for parents. The ruling found that parents must name their child as the one responsible for downloading a torrent or they will be held responsible for the violation.

A series of recent cases have been defining how Germany’s legal system will handle parents who claim their innocence in illegal file-sharing but are being pursued by copyright claimants. The most recent involve a claim brought by Universal Music Group regarding the illegal downloading of Rihanna’s 2011 album Loud. The parents received a notice from Universal demanding payment. The parents said they weren’t really fans of Ri-Ri but one of their three children was responsible. They had no intention of snitching on their own kid and took their case to court.

In October 2016, the same court had to review a similar case in which a man denied pirating files and named his wife as a co-user of the household broadband connection. He refused to provide details his wife’s browsing habits and successfully argued that under German law citizens are protected from violating the privacy of their family.

However, this week’s verdict turned out with a different twist. The parents were found liable for the child’s torrenting and ordered to pay €3,879.80 ($4,137.61) in fines. The court chairman, Wolfgang Büscher, argued that this case “is not comparable” to the one from October because the child had admitted everything to their parents. Since the parents had admitted that they knew which child was responsible but refused to give a name they will have to “bear the corresponding disadvantages.”

This a blow to the parents of torrent-happy children across Germany and follows on the heels of a similar case from earlier in March. In those proceedings, a father claimed that his 11-year-old son had downloaded a book that was the subject of a copyright complaint. He explained that he had warned his son not to “download random things or do anything dangerous,” The judge ruled that the father would have to be held responsible.

Germany is considered one the best countries in the world for internet freedom and the protection of privacy, but very  strict when it comes to the enforcement of copyright

It’s a blow to the parents of torrent-happy children across Germany and follows on the heels of a similar case from earlier in March. In those proceedings, a father claimed that his 11-year-old son had downloaded a book that was the subject of a copyright complaint. He explained that he had warned his son not to “download random things or do anything dangerous,” according to Torrent Freak. A judge ruled that the father is responsible for the download because he is required to “instruct a child on the illegality of participating in illegal file-sharing exchanges, and to explicitly prohibit this behavior.”

 

Hidden Figures Katherine Johnson

Katherine Johnson, the movie Hidden Figures protagonist, was something of a child prodigy. Coming from the small West Virginian town of White Sulphur Springs, she graduated from high school at 14 and the historically black West Virginia State University at 18. In 1938, as a graduate student, she became one of three students—and the only woman—to desegregate West Virginia’s state college. In 1953, Johnson was hired by NACA and, five years later, NACA became NASA thanks to the Space Act of 1958.

Johnson’s first big NASA assignment was computing the trajectories for Alan Shepard’s historic flight in 1961. Johnson and her team’s job was to trace out in extreme detail Freedom 7’s exact path from liftoff to splashdown. Since it was designed to be a ballistic flight—in that, it was like a bullet from a gun with a capsule going up and coming down in a big parabola—it was relatively simple in least in the context of what was to come. Nonetheless, it was a huge success and NASA immediately set their sights on America’s first orbital mission.

 The film primarily focuses on John Glenn’s 1962 trip around the globe and does add dramatic flourishes that are, well, Hollywood. However, most of the events in the movie are historically accurate. Johnson’s main job in the lead-up and during the mission was to double-check and reverse engineer the newly-installed IBM 7090s trajectory calculations. As it shows, there were very tense moments during the flight that forced the mission to end earlier than expected. And John Glenn did request that Johnson specifically check and confirm trajectories and entry points that the IBM spat out (albeit, perhaps, not at the exact moment that the movie depicts). As Shetterly wrote in her book and explained in a September NPR interview, Glenn did not completely trust the computer. So, he asked the head engineers to “get the girl to check the numbers… If she says the numbers are good… I’m ready to go.”

Johnson would go on to work on the Apollo program, too, including performing trajectory calculations that assisted the 1969 moon landing. She would retire from NASA in 1986. In 2015, President Obama gave Katherine Johnson the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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