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Enlarge/ This is a page from Oh, the Places You’ll Boldly Go!, which Dr. Seuss Enterprises claims infringes its copyright.
A judge has allowed a lawsuit to move forward against the creators of Oh, the Places You’ll Boldly Go!—a nearly page-for-page remix of the Dr. Seuss classic Oh, the Places You’ll Go! and Star Trek. This decision reverses an earlier ruling.After receiving a new court filing, US District Judge Janis Sammartino found that ComicMix, the company behind the new work, could not so easily have the case dismissed.

The new book originally raised tens of thousands of dollars on Kick starter before being taken down in October 2016. A lawsuit ensued soon after. Dr. Seuss Enterprises v. Comic Mix LLC, which was filed in federal court in San Diego in November 2016. Dr. Seuss Enterprises (DSE) represents the works of the now-deceased but still iconic children’s book author, Theodor Geisel.

DSE argued that ComicMix’s new mashup infringed on its intellectual property rights, while ComicMix argued that it was allowed under the fair use doctrine of American copyright law. That notion allows for certain remixes to be created and sold under certain conditions without violating the original copyright.

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Donna Brazile’s Book & All The Fuss About It

Hacks: The Inside Story of the Break-ins and Breakdowns that Put Donald Trump in the White House to be published on November 7, 2017, by Hachette Books, a division of Hachette Book Group. Copyright 2017 Donna Brazile.

The Excerpt

The response

 

James Comey New Book

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National Book Awards Finalist

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FICTION

“Dark at the Crossing” by Elliot Ackerman (Knopf)

“The Leavers” by Lisa Ko (Algonquin Books)

“Pachinko” by Min Jin Lee (Grand Central Publishing)

“Her Body and Other Parties: Stories” by Carmen Maria Machado (Graywolf Press)

“Sing, Unburied, Sing” by Jesmyn Ward (Scribner)

NONFICTION

“Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge” by Erica Armstrong Dunbar (37 Ink)

“The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America” by Frances FitzGerald(Simon & Schuster)

“The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia” by MashaGessen (Riverhead)

“Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI” by David Grann (Doubleday)

“Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America” by Nancy MacLean (Viking)

POETRY

“Half-Light: Collected Poems 1965-2016” by Frank Bidart (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

“The Book of Endings” by Leslie Harrison (University of Akron Press)

“Whereas” by Layli Long Soldier (Graywolf Press)

“In the Language of My Captor” by Shane McCrae (Wesleyan University Press)

“Don’t Call Us Dead: Poems” by Danez Smith (Graywolf Press)

YOUNG PEOPLES LITERATURE

“What Girls Are Made Of” by Elana K. Arnold (Carolrhoda Lab)

“Far From the Tree” by Robin Benway (HarperTeen)

“I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter” by Erika L. Sánchez (Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers)

“Clayton Byrd Goes Underground” by Rita Williams-Garcia (Amistad)

American Street” by Ibi Zoboi (Balzer + Bray)

See the long lists in young people’s literature, poetry, nonfiction and fiction.

The fundraising gala where the winners will be announced takes place Nov. 15 in New York.

Spotting Counterfeit Books

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Counterfeit Clues: A high-demand textbook sold for way below Amazon’s price on a non-Amazon site like eBay.

If you’re sourcing online, this is a big one to look for. Counterfeiters love bootlegging the most popular textbooks, then unloading them for cheap(ish) prices on off-Amazon sites like Alibris, eBay, and more.

I would advise you to scrutinize any listing closely, but fact is no seller is going to admit their book is counterfeit. So if it seems too good to be true, it doesn’t necessarily mean it is (good mistakes do happen). But you’re taking your chances.

Thin, low-quality paper.

Big red flag: Paper that is so thin you can see text on one side of the page through the other side of the page.

Poor quality distorted cover art.

Art that looks slightly distorted or “off.”

Major textbook publishers will never publish a book with fuzzy or weird cover art. They have whole art departments who make sure this doesn’t happen.

Counterfeit Clue #5: Fuzzy barcode.

The first place to look when determining if a textbook is counterfeit is the barcode. If the barcode is distorted or fuzzy – it’s a fake. 100% of the time.

Note: Countefeiters only bootleg expensive, high-demand textbooks.

If you’re not holding a textbook ranked in the top 10,000, it’s probably not counterfeit.

That’s not to say that old counterfeit textbooks won’t stay in circulation, but the bulk of the business in counterfeits is the latest hot new high demand textbooks. They print a bunch of them, sell them quickly, and move on. Those are the books most likely to end up in your Amazon inventory (and be flagged by Amazon).

Hachette Book Group Terminates Weinstein Books Imprint Effective Immediately.

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Weinstein titles will now be published under the Hachette Books imprint, Deadline has confirmed.

The company said in a statement, “Hachette Book Group has terminated the Weinstein Books imprint, effective immediately (Perseus Books has had a co-publishing agreement with The Weinstein Company, under which we published around ten new books a year). Titles currently under the Weinstein Books imprint will be published by Hachette Books imprint, and the Weinstein Books imprint team will join Hachette Books.

The imprint, which was originally called Miramax Books, was founded in 2001 by Bob and Harvey Weinstein. It relaunched in 2009 as part of Perseus Books, an independent publishing company that Hachette bought in 2016. The imprint typically publishes around 10 new titles a year.

Despite the Weinstein’s cache in the entertainment industry, Weinstein Books never made much of a mark in the literary world. The majority of its titles tend to be celebrity-driven memoirs and diet and wellness books.

More Medical Schools Going Bookless

AILEEN MCCRILLIS
NYU health sciences library

The Association of American Medical Colleges predicted that by 2030, the United States would have a shortage of up to 104,900 physicians. To try to curb this impending crisis, a wave of new medical schools have opened in the last decade. Eleven schools have been accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education in the last five years, and eight more are currently under consideration.

As a condition of accreditation, these new schools must provide access to “well-maintained library resources sufficient in breadth of holdings and technology” to support the school’s educational mission, however, many medical schools are deciding that large print collections are no longer a vital component of those resources.

Paperless Libraries

Charles Stewart, associate dean and chief librarian of City College of New York, of the City University of New York system, said that his institution chose to go a paperless route for the newly opened CUNY School of Medicine on the City College campus for much the same reason — 24-7 access. “Stewart says they chose the all-electronic option since their medical school clearly wanted instant e-access to all their resources.

 

The Frank H. Netter School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University, which accepted its first students in 2013, is designed as a paperless institution. The school has a library space where students can read and study, but the vast majority of the library’s resources are online. Bruce Koeppen, dean of the school, said that by making most of the library’s holdings electronic, it ensured that students and faculty could access information “anywhere and anytime, even when the library is closed.”

Hybrid Approach

The Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, opened in 2010, with just 50 books on its shelves, however, the students quickly pushed to expand this collection to 4,000 books, saying that they preferred to use physical materials for studying. The school noted, however, that it did not want to increase its print collection beyond the current level.

Fay Towell, director of libraries at the Greenville Hospital System, said that it was interesting that students at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, which opened in 2012, frequently requested access to both print and electronic resources. Given the small size of the library, and the prohibitive cost of providing both print and online versions of texts, Towell said the library had to be selective. She noted that often journals might cost more electronically than in print — “if a journal cost is $4,000 electronically and $400 in print, then the library makes space for print,” she said.

Roger Schonfeld, director of the Library and Scholarly Communication Program for Ithaka S+R, pointed out that when medical libraries thin their print collections, it does not necessarily mean that the campus loses access to those physical materials. “Whether the collections are moved to an off-site facility, or the library participates in a shared print program, it is almost always still possible to provide access to a print version on those occasions when it is necessary to do so.” The trend for thinning print collections is not unique to medical libraries, said Schonfeld — many science and engineering libraries have done the same.

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