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The new Thing In Mental Healthcare

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Dr Jeffrey Lieberman from Columbia University says” the new technologic innovation that is emerging and which does seem likely to impact psychiatry and mental health care in a time that is commensurate with the other specialties of medicine, is the technology that informs how we use Internet-based smartphone mobile app devices. The rudimentary ways in which this has already begun to permeate medicine and mental health care include electronic health records and telemedicine, which is ideally suited to psychiatry in terms of being able to provide consultation at a distance.“The initial idea is to have smartphone-based applications that can perform several functions. One is a monitoring function: having apps that can passively monitor the activities or biologic signals of an individual—whether it is movement, heart rate, respiratory rate, or level of activity—and have an ongoing record that can be catalogued, observed, and interpreted by clinicians. A second function is as a means of communication. Doctors already have begun to employ FaceTime, Skype, and texting to maintain contact with patients remotely in a variety of situations. Another area would be to develop apps that could provide some kind of actual therapeutic assistance, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, and supportive types of techniques or protocols when needed. All of these have great potential and can expand the reach of healthcare providers, psychiatrists, and mental health care clinicians, and provide help to a larger proportion of people when they need it.”

LightStrike Germ-Zapping Robot Can Eliminated Hospital Germs

 

Hospitals around the world are constantly for new and innovative ways to battle deadly pathogens and kill multidrug resistant organisms that can cause hospital-acquired infections (HAI).

Saint Peter’s University Hospital has implemented a LightStrike Germ-Zapping Robot that emits waves of ultraviolet (UV) light to destroy hard-to-kill bugs in hard-to-clean places.

Their goal is to prevent infection & provide a clean, safe environment for their patients,  families and employees. The latest technology provides an added level of protection in combating HAI’s caused by pathogens such as Clostridium difficile and Staphylococcus aureus.

The Xenex robot is a new technology that uses pulsed xenon, a high-intensity UV light that penetrates the cell walls of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, mold, fungus and spores. Their DNA is fused, rendering them unable to reproduce or mutate, effectively killing them on surfaces without contact or chemicals.

The system is effective against even the most dangerous pathogens, including Clostridium difficile (C. diff), norovirus, influenza, Ebola and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, better known as MRSA. Over 400 hospitals, Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense facilities in the U.S., Canada, Africa, Japan and Europe are using Xenex robots, which are also in use in skilled nursing facilities, ambulatory surgery centers, and long-term acute-care facilities.

The Future Of Healthcare & What They’re Saying

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By 2019, 3D printing is expected to be a crucial tool in up to 35 per cent of surgeries.

In 2021, artificial intelligence (AI) is due to assist doctors in treating patients.

AI ‘chatbots’ are expected to outperform humans at some surgical procedures in 2030.

And in 2035, our senses will be able to be upgraded with implants that detect X-rays.

In the future, patients will still need specialists with expert knowledge but the difference is that advanced AI systems will assist healthcare practitioners by providing clinical and medical solutions; sometimes eliminating the need to see a doctor at all.

 

The Future Of Healthcare & It’s Tranformation

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The pressure to ensure accessibility, affordability, quality and sustainability, while leveraging technology in healthcare, will be on in the coming year.

As healthcare moves into the future, the quest for quality and affordability continues to be the key driver for transformation.Traditional healthcare is often said to be more “disease-care” than “healthcare”, with healthcare systems focusing on caring for the sick, expanding and improving infrastructure, and figuring out long-term financing for healthcare in an aging population. Increasingly, both medical science as well as consumers are recognizing that prevention is better than cure, especially for chronic diseases.

There has also been a overabundance of health and wellness apps – from nutrition apps to fitness trackers monitored by wearable sensors – that support this shift.Such technology not only monitors and offers insights on a person’s physiological status, but also recommends nearby healthy eateries and food selections, fitness-related events as well as exercise facilities.

This places personal health and preventative care rightfully back into the individual’s hands, shifting the outcome towards a more active and healthier community.

Health care’s resistance to transform is likely bolstered by concerns about patient data privacy, a dependence on highly specialized skills, professional ethics and a traditional emphasis on the human touch in the practice of medicine.

In Singapore, all hospitals have gone digital to a large extent, and the Government is encouraging nursing homes and GP (general practitioner) clinics across the island to follow suit.

With an Electronic Medical Record system, real-time Integrated Health Information Systems and an automated inpatient pharmacy already implemented, the next step for hospitals will be widespread tele­health services for discharged patients and the elderly in the community.

Robotics customized for the healing environment can improve patient care while relieving manpower shortages, and provide a better working environment.With everything including life-support systems hyper-connected in the Internet of Things (Io T) , cyber security will become of utmost importance.

In order to adapt to societal needs, modern healthcare professionals need to be well-educated in the management of technological capabilities and deliver patient-centric solutions.

Cameras Turned Into Health Monitors

Implantables in Healthcare: The Next Trend

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The medical possibilities for intelligent, internet-enabled medical devices is huge, with one recent estimate expecting the global market to be worth US$163bn by 2020. 

Proteus Discover,  of US healthcare firm Proteus Digital Health. Developed in collaboration with Japan-based Otsuka Pharmaceuticals, Discover is a microscopic sensor contained within an ingestible pill. The sensor activates on contact with stomach acids and then starts relaying clinical health data to a replaceable patch worn on the patient’s torso. The technique is initially being used primarily for patients with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, such as hypertension and Type 2 diabetes.The patch also registers the time that the medication was taken and a patient’s subsequent behavioural patterns (sleep, exercise, etc). The information is then loaded up wirelessly to an app on the patient’s smartphone and then to the Proteus Cloud.

Barriers To consider

Cybersecurity breaches— If hackers can infiltrate the medical records of sports stars such as British cyclist Bradley Wiggins and the US gymnast Simone Biles, what’s to say biometric information from your implantable might somehow find its way to your health insurance provider or to a tech company like Google (which is currently experimenting with a “smart” contact lens)?

 

 

 

Stats On Herpes

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