Always Providing You With Information

Easter

In Western Christianity, Easter marks the end of Lent, a 40-day period of fasting, repentance, moderation and spiritual discipline in preparation for Easter. Lent begins on Ash Wednesday and ends on Easter Sunday. Eastern Orthodox churches observe Lent or Great Lent, during the 6 weeks or 40 days preceding Palm Sunday with fasting continuing during the Holy Week of Easter. Lent for Eastern Orthodox churches begins on Monday and Ash Wednesday is not observed.

Because of Easter’s pagan origins, and also because of the commercialization of Easter, many Christian churches choose to refer to the holiday as Resurrection Day. In Western Christianity, Easter is always celebrated on the Sunday immediately following the Paschal Full Moon. Beginning in 325 AD with the Council of Nicea), the Western Church decided to established a more standardized system for determining the date of Easter.

In 2013, for example, Easter was celebrated on March 31 by Western churches and May 5 by Orthodox churches. But in 2014, the two celebrations occur on the same date, April 20.  Western churches use the Gregorian calendar, the standard calendar for much of the world, and Orthodox churches use the older, Julian calendar.

That much is straightforward. But actually calculating these dates involves a bewildering array of ecclesiastical moons and paschal full moons, the astronomical equinox, and the fixed equinox— and that’s in addition to the two different calendar systems.

The two churches vary on the definition of the vernal equinox and the full moon. The Eastern Church sets the date of Easter according to the actual, astronomical full moon and the actual equinox as observed along the meridian of Jerusalem, site of the Crucifixion and Resurrection

The Eastern Orthodox Church also applies the formula so that Easter always falls after Passover, since the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Christ took place after he entered Jerusalem to celebrate Passover. In the Western Church, Easter sometime

A meeting was organized by the Council of World Churches (in Aleppo, Syria, March 5–10, 1997) Where a solution was proposed and thought to be favorable to both East and West: both methods of calculating the equinox and the paschal full moon would be replaced with the most advanced astronomically accurate calculations available, using the meridian of Jerusalem as the point of measure. Since that meeting, however, no further progress has been made and the problem remains.

Fasika (Orthodox Easter)
April 15, 2012; May 5, 2013; April 20, 2014; April 12, 2015; May 1, 2016

Fasika is Ethiopian Easter and is celebrated in conjunction with Orthodox Easter celebrations around the world.  Fasika is the most important holiday in the Ethiopian Orthodox calendar and follows a long 55-day fast, where no meat or dairy products are consumed.  Strict followers generally consume one meal of vegetables and lentils during this time.  Church services are attended on the eve before the holiday, where revelers participate in a colorful service lit with candles.  The following day, families and friends celebrate Fasika with special feasts that mark the end of the long fast. Doro wat, a spicy chicken stew, is the most traditional food served in all households. Celebrations continue for the following week, with an unofficial “second Fasika” the following weekend.

Axum has a colorful procession for Palm Sunday (known as Hosanna), the week before Fasika which is well worth a visit.  Like most holidays, the celebration takes place the night before the actually holiday (Saturday night).

Since the beginning of the 20th century, a proposal to change Easter to a fixed holiday rather than a movable one has been widely circulated, and in 1963 the Second Vatican Council agreed, provided a consensus could be reached among Christian churches. The second Sunday in April has been suggested as the most likely date. precedes Passover by weeks

The Easter Bunny

Some believe, rabbits were associated with the Teutonic deity Eostra, the goddess of spring and fertility, for their especially high reproduction rate. Eggs, and especially their hatching, are another symbol of spring with roots in pagan tradition, according to History.com.

Germanic, pagan, spring traditions and Christian resurrection tradition were quickly melded together as Roman Catholicism became the dominant religion in the region around the 15th century, according to Discovery. As a result, the Easter Bunny tradition in America takes its roots in the German settlers of Pennsylvania

According to some sources, the Easter bunny first arrived in America in the 1700s with German immigrants who settled in Pennsylvania and transported their tradition of an egg-laying hare called “Osterhase” or “Oschter Haws.” Their children made nests in which this creature could lay its colored eggs

 

 

Snapshotgolddress_002

Ambulance Paramedics in New Zealand are receiving new technology. Paramedics will soon be using a handheld electronic device that gives crews access to new tools at the touch of a button, improving their ability to provide care on the frontline.  This new system replace the four carbon copies of paperwork currently used, it also means crews can forward patient information electronically to an emergency department – all while on the road. For example, ambulance crews can send photos of injuries to specialists for advice, such as patients trapped in car accidents.  GPs will be sent a summary of their patient’s ambulance callouts.

web1_1175294-8edfddf8111149dd9e935b1915bff56a.jpg

The Mummy of Tamut, a temple singer around 900 BC, was displayed during a press conference at the British Museum in London, Wednesday April 9, 2014. Scientists at the British Museum have used CT scans and volume graphics software to go beneath the bandages, revealing the skin, bones, internal organs, and in one case a brain-scooping rod left inside a skull by embalmers. The results are going on display in an exhibition which sets eight of the museum’s mummies alongside detailed 3-D images of their insides. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

 

Snapshot127_001Puff Daddy Named Howard University's Commencement Speaker

sitlibrary1_001

Combs, a former Howard student, will also receive an honorary doctorate in humanities at the ceremony.

May 10.2014

Snapshot_112

Google Inc will take online orders for its Glass wearable gadget on April 15, with the asking price of $1500 in the U.S.

For a limited time starting Tuesday, Google will make the wearable device available to more than just the select group of users such as apps developers in its Glass Explorer program.

In a blogpost, Google that the quantity would be limited. Tuesday, April 15th, They will be trying their latest and biggest Explorer Program expansion experiment to date. Anyone in the U.S. will be able to become an Explorer by purchasing Glass.

Many tech pundits expect wearable devices to go mainstream this year, extending smartphone and tablet capabilities to gadgets worn on the body, from watches to headsets. Google has run campaigns in the past to drum up public involvement, including inviting people to tweet under the hashtag #ifihadglass for a chance to buy a pair of the glasses.

Google Glass has raised privacy concerns, prompting some legislators to propose bans on the gadget

Snapshotblack jacket6_001

Palm Sunday is the sixth Sunday of Lent and the last Sunday before Easter. It is also known as Passion Sunday, Willow Sunday, and Flower Sunday.

Palm Sunday commemorates the triumphal entry of Jesus into Jerusalem, where he would be crucified five days later. According to the Gospels, Jesus rode into town on a donkey as exuberant crowds hailed him as the Messiah and spread out palm branches and cloaks in his path.

The event commemorated on Palm Sunday is told in all four gospels (Matthew 21, Mark 11, Luke 19, John 12). 

 Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord. We bless you from the house of the Lord 

Tag Cloud

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 102 other followers