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The Portraits Of Brack & Michelle Obama

Kehinde Wiley, Barack Obama, 2018. © 2018 Kehinde Wiley. Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Washington D.C.

Kehinde Wiley, Barack Obama, 2018. © 2018 Kehinde Wiley. Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Washington D.C.

Amy Sherald, Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama, 2018. Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Washington D.C.

Amy Sherald, Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama, 2018. Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Washington D.C

© 2018 Pete Souza. Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Washington D.C.

 

The unveiling of the portraits of President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama has created an unprecedented surge of interest in both portraitists, especially Amy Sherald, whose work was relatively new to the market before her commission.

For Sherald, a 44-year-old Baltimore painter who produces roughly a dozen works a year, the demand is so strong it’s basically blown up the waitlist for her paintings, which had been growing ever since demand spiked for the artist’s limited number of works, following her first solo show at Monique Meloche Gallery in Chicago in 2016.

© 2018 Pete Souza. Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Washington D.C.

© 2018 Pete Souza. Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Washington D.C.

“The ability to be the first African American painter to paint the first African American president of the United States,” said Wiley, “It doesn’t get any better than that.”

The Obamas were the first African American family in the White House, now they are  the first African Americans in the National Portrait Gallery’s collection of presidential portraits. The National Portrait Gallery was established in 1962, and is housed in the Old Patent Office Building in Washington’s Chinatown.

Exquisite Blackamoor Jewelry: A Brief History

The inhabitants of the coast wore gold earrings with enamels white and black like amulets to exorcize the danger of pirates or gave to the churches as votive promises. This is for sure the primigenial blackamoor jewelry that anyway arrived in few years to the motherland.

 

Venetian Blackamoor jewelry is known as the most representative example of the typical Italian skill and handicraft that takes his roots in the history of the Venice Republic (“La Serenissima”): since the 16th century the antique moors have become symbols of Venetian goldsmith tradition and still, now they’re part of our culture and legacy

Even today, blackamoors are considered the most wanted and typical expression of Venetian jewelry: testimonials of this everlasting elegance have been icons of the 20th century as Grace Kelly, Ernest Hemingway, Liz Taylor, Barbara Hutton, Arthur Rubinstein and Elton John (cit. Wikipedia)

Exquisite artwork with jewels on black-faced images

 

Image result for expensive blackamoor antique jewels and brooches

 

Google Launches Photography Apps

Storyboard

The apps dubbed “appsperiments” are available on both the iOS App Store and Google Play. The three apps in question are called Storyboard, Selfissimo!, and Scrubbies.

The first, Storyboard, turns videos into single-page comic layouts on your device. Turning photos into images inspired by art – including comic book art – is something that grew popular with the launch of the A.I.-powered editing app Prisma.

Selfissimo!

Selfissimo! (iOS, Android) is an automated selfie photographer that snaps a stylish black and white photo each time you pose. Tap the screen to start a photoshoot. The app encourages you to pose and captures a photo whenever you stop moving. Tap again to end the session and review the resulting contact sheet, saving individual images or the entire shoot.

Scrubbies

Scrubbies (iOS) allows you to easily manipulate the speed and direction of video playback to produce lovely video loops that highlight actions, capture funny faces, and replay moments. You can shoot a video in the app and then remix it by scratching it like a DJ.

The Library Of Rare Colors

Vials of pigments held by the Forbes Collection. Photo by Tony Luong for Artsy.

The fifth floor of Harvard’s art museum contains rare pigments. Mummy Brown is a pigment produced by grinding up the flesh of Egyptian mummies. It appeared as early as the 16th century; production continued until the 1960s, when the supply of embalmed bodies finally petered out. While the historical record confirms that artists did purchase the paint, researchers have yet to find an artwork in which the pigment is definitively present. But a newly surfaced studio inventory for de la Cruz lists Mummy Brown among his supplies. If accurate, this portrait will be the first confirmed use of the pigment in a work of art.

Narayan Khandekar stands in front of a 17th-century Spanish painting that may contain Mummy Brown. Photo by Tony Luong for Artsy.

Narayan Khandekar stands in front of a 17th-century Spanish painting that may contain Mummy Brown. Photo by Tony Luong for Artsy.

Mummy Brown is a pigment produced by grinding up the flesh of Egyptian mummies. It appeared as early as the 16th century; production continued until the 1960s, when the supply of embalmed bodies finally petered out. While the historical record confirms that artists did purchase the paint, Khandekar says researchers have yet to find an artwork in which the pigment is definitively present. But a newly surfaced studio inventory for de la Cruz lists Mummy Brown among his supplies. If accurate, this portrait will be the first confirmed use of the pigment in a work of art.

Alongside a few tubes of Mummy Brown are other pigments whose origin stories are practically legend. Tyrian purple, an ancient Phoenician dye that requires 10,000 mollusks to produce a single gram of pigment. Ultramarine, a vivid blue made from lapis lazuli mined in Afghanistan, was once more precious than gold.

The Gettens Cabinet at Harvard’s Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies. Photo by Tony Luong for Artsy.

The Gettens Cabinet at Harvard’s Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies. Photo by Tony Luong for Artsy

Forbes, the grandson of poet Ralph Waldo Emerson, graduated from Harvard in 1895. He set sail for Europe to experience firsthand the great classical, medieval, and Renaissance works he’d learned about in class. He started to acquire art, loaning (and eventually donating) his collection to Harvard’s newly-founded Fogg Museum.

Photo by Tony Luong for Artsy.

Photo by Tony Luong for Artsy.

Pigments collected by Edward Forbes during a 1932 trip to Japan. Photo by Tony Luong for Artsy.

Pigments collected by Edward Forbes during a 1932

 

Gold In Art work

Pendant in the Shape of an Uraeus, 2030-1650 B.C. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Pendant in the Shape of an Uraeus, 2030-1650 B.C. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Catalan Atlas, 1375. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

Catalan Atlas, 1375. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

Folio from a Qu'ran Manuscript, late 13th-early 14th century. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Folio from a Qu’ran Manuscript, late 13th-early 14th century. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Duccio di Buoninsegna, The Maestà, 1308-11. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.
Duccio di Buoninsegna, The Maestà, 1308-11. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

 

Imperial Gate mosaic at the Hagia Sophia, Istanbul. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.
Imperial Gate mosaic at the Hagia Sophia, Istanbul. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

The ancient Egyptians transformed gold into objects invested with divine associations and ornate decorations for divinely ordained rulers. Gold would quickly come to signify not only godliness, but wealth, purity, and prestige. Indeed, throughout human history, works of art incorporating gold have served myriad purposes, from displays of piety to displays of economic power and luxury.

The earliest gold artifacts discovered by archaeologists were found in the Eastern Mediterranean and date to around the 4th millennium BC. Today, the use of gold is more widespread—you might even find an extremely upmarket dessert coated in thin, flavorless gold leaf.

Though it was considered impious to wear too much gold in Islamic society, the wealthy still owned and sometimes wore it to show their power. The Muslim king Musa Keita I of Mali, for example, who reigned from 1312 to 1337 CE, is considered by some to have been the richest man in the history of the world, even adjusted to inflation, due to his vast stores of gold.

New York City’s Cultural Future

Brooklyn Borough-Wide Workshop. Image courtesy of Hester Street Collaborative and Create NYC

Queens Borough-Wide Workshop. Image courtesy of Hester Street Collaborative and Create NYC.

New York City’s Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA)a report detailing the results of roughly seven months of public engagement conducted in the lead up to the city’s forthcoming cultural plan. The agency engaged 188,000 New Yorkers—via focus groups, phone surveys, and hundreds of community events—in order to compile its brief.

The plan’s website Residents are also invited to provide in-person feedback at city-wide events through May 31st. DCLA commissioner Tom Finkelpearl says The responses will be “data points,” used to further refine the city’s first-ever cultural plan.

Why Would A Painting Of Scull Cost So Much?

  • Photo via Yusaku Maezawa on Twitter: “I am a lucky man.”

    A poet, musician, and graffiti prodigy in late-1970s New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat’s painting style consist of obsessive scribbling, elusive symbols and diagrams, and mask-and-skull imagery by the time he was 20. “I don’t think about art while I work,” he once said. “I think about life.” Basquiat drew his subjects from his own Caribbean heritage—his father was Haitian and his mother of Puerto Rican descent—and a convergence of African-American, African, and Aztec cultural histories with Classical themes and contemporary heroes like athletes and musicians. Often associated with Neo-expressionism, Basquiat received massive acclaim in only a few short years, showing alongside artists like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and Francesco Clemente. In 1983, he met Andy Warhol, who would come to be a mentor and idol. The two collaborated on a series of paintings before Warhol’s death in 1987, followed by Basquiat’s own untimely passing a year later.

    American, 1960-1988, New York, New York, based in New York, New York

    Yusaku Maezawa, the Japanese e-commerce billionaire, purchased Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Untitled (1982) at Thursday night’s Contemporary Art evening sale at Sotheby’s. The canvas was hammered down at $98 million after a dramatic 10-minute bidding war, coming to $110.4 million with the buyer’s premium. It marks the highest auction price ever for an American artist—unseating Andy Warhol, whose $105 million auction record was set by Silver Car Crash (Double Disaster) (1963) at Sotheby’s New York in November 2013—and the second-highest price for any contemporary work.

     

     

 

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