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Posts tagged ‘Psychology’

Florida Attorney-General Pam Bondi with Mr Donald Trump at a meeting with local and state officials on school safety on Thursday. Mr Trump has suggested arming a significant portion of the educator workforce - between 10 and 40 per cent of teachers -Florida Attorney-General Pam Bondi with Mr Donald Trump at a meeting with local and state officials on school safety on Thursday. Mr Trump has suggested arming a significant portion of the educator workforce – between 10 and 40 per cent of teachers – using federal resources.

 United States educators have expressed frustration at a proposal by US President Donald Trump for teachers to take up arms to defend their classrooms against school shooters.

Many teachers expressed concerns about scenarios in which they could face shooters on a hectic campus – or even, potentially, draw a gun to confront an armed and dangerous student. 

Mr Trump suggested arming a significant portion of the educator workforce – between 10 and 40 per cent of teachers – using federal resources. He said military veterans who teach would be prime candidates for these roles. 

Many schools already hire police officers or armed guards to patrol campuses with the help of federal money. About 57 per cent of public schools in the 2015/2016 school year had security staff on campus at least once a week and nearly 43 per cent were patrolled by armed law enforcement officers, according to federal data.

 Dr Dewey Cornell, a University of Virginia professor who studies school safety said, “The proposal to arm teachers might be emotionally appealing after a school shooting, but it is not practical or realistic,” said 

“We should place more emphasis on preventing shootings than preparing for shootings. Prevention must start long before a gunman shows up at school. Instead of more guards, we need more counselors.”



Gaming Disorder The New Mental Illness 2018



The newly classified gaming disorder is now included as an affliction. Those who suffer from the disorder are said to have “impaired control over gaming. Gaming disorder is characterized by a pattern of persistent or recurrent gaming behaviour (‘digital gaming’ or ‘video-gaming’), which may be online (i.e., over the internet) or offline, manifested by: 1) impaired control over gaming (e.g., onset, frequency, intensity, duration, termination, context); 2) increasing priority given to gaming to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other life interests and daily activities; and 3) continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences. The behaviour pattern is of sufficient severity to result in significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning. The pattern of gaming behaviour may be continuous or episodic and recurrent. The gaming behaviour and other features are normally evident over a period of at least 12 months in order for a diagnosis to be assigned, although the required duration may be shortened if all diagnostic requirements are met and symptoms are severe.

Substitute Phones For Restless Fingers & Cell Phone Addiction

 Klemens Schillinger’s Substitute Phones are made of high-quality, heavy-duty plastic designed to mimic the look and feel of a traditional smartphone. The devices feature stone beads which are designed to simulate the various gestures one would make on their smartphone. They’re like phone-shaped fidget spinners. The same tactile urge to touch and swipe like your actual smartphone does, is fulfilled, but will give you a break from the constant text messages and notifications.The calming limitation can also offer help for smartphone addicts to cope with withdrawal symptoms.







Undermining Is Toxic


The Signs

They put you on the defensive

Underminers typically don’t stick to just one victim(someone was had in the past)

  A gossip-monger

They try to distract you

They leave you out

 Sabotaging your reputation by spreading nasty rumors

Presenting himself or herself as your superior

Slightly rude comments, backhanded compliments, and hostile, mocking body language

You haven’t done anything wrong — at least, you don’t think you have — but everyone seems to be treating you strangely, from your fellow coworkers to your boss. Can’t figure out what’s up?It’s possible that your undermining colleague has already gotten to them.

Unlike overt bullying or harassment, undermining can be harder to pinpoint and detect.The underminer doesn’t use blatantly hostile language or actions to take you down. He or she quietly works to bring you down, which is why it’s important to be extra careful around them.

Always trust your gut and proceed with caution


The Stalkers Profile


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Stalkers often suffer from low self-esteem, and feel they must have a relationship with the victim in order to have any self worth.

Preoccupations with other people almost always involve someone with weak social skills and low self-esteem.

Few stalkers can see how their actions are hurting others.

They display other sociopathic thinking in that they cannot learn from experience, and they don’t believe society’s rules apply to them. Most stalkers don’t think they’re really threatening, intimidating, or even stalking someone else. They think they’re simply trying to show the victims that they’re the right one for them.  To the victims of stalking it is like a prolonged rape.

Sociopathic thinking

Has a mean streak

No or few personal relationships

Lack of embarrassment or discomfort at actions

In “A Study of Stalkers” Mullen et al.. (2000)[16] identified five types of stalkers:
Rejected stalkers pursue their victims in order to reverse, correct, or avenge a rejection (e.g. divorce, separation, termination).
Resentful stalkers pursue a vendetta because of a sense of grievance against the victims – motivated mainly by the desire to frighten and distress the victim.
Intimacy seekers seek to establish an intimate, loving relationship with their victim. Such stalkers often believe that the victim is a long-sought-after soul mate, and they were ‘meant’ to be together.
Incompetent suitors, despite poor social or courting skills, have a fixation, or in some cases, a sense of entitlement to an intimate relationship with those who have attracted their amorous interest. Their victims are most often already in a dating relationship with someone else.
Predatory stalkers spy on the victim in order to prepare and plan an attack – often sexual – on the victim.


British Libraries Offering Full Bibliotherapy Service

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British libraries offer full bibliotherapy services, including recommendations and exhaustive reading lists based on condition, to anyone, at every library in the U.K., at no cost.This year, London-based charity The Reading Agency and the Society of Chief Librarians expanded bibliotherapy service to form Reading Well for Young People, an extension of its regular adult program to help teens and children find their way through problems like mental illness, bullying, exam pressure and eating disorders.

Nearly half a million people have used the service since its inception in January 2015, the Reading Agency reports — 90 percent of people who borrowed “prescribed” books based on their conditions said they helped and 85 percent said the books helped their symptoms feel manageable. Experts say books featuring characters or people that share a patient’s struggles can be an incredibly important piece of a larger treatment plan designed to give patients something a pill can’t always offer: Hope

Bibliotherapy likely first came to the U.S. from Britain after World War I. Jane Austen novels helped calm soldiers afflicted with PTSD (then called “shellshock”). Then, as now, the main premise of bibliotherapy is pretty simple: Personal transformation through reading. People potentially stand to learn and be emotionally affected as much by a fictional person or situation.

Librarian and bibliotherapist Sadie Peterson Delaney, prescribed books to recovering African-American veterans at the U.S. Veterans Administration Hospital in 1920s Tuskegee, Alabama. She started small, using fairy tales to help bed-ridden, traumatized veterans make sense of their own emotional struggles and then began a public appeal for book donations for and about black Americans to help her patients, as she put it, “fit themselves for life.”

W.E.B. Du Bois’ “Dark Princess gave her patients purpose and hope to take with them when they were released back into segregated America.

“Books about the Negro cannot be written fast enough to satisfy the insatiate desire of these veterans,” wrote Delaney, who saw such books as “aiding him in his upward struggle to lay aside prejudice, all sense of defeat, and to take in that which is helpful and inspiring by the means of books.”

Nursing a broken heart? The Medicine is Charlotte Bronte’s “Jane Eyre”. Patients are given a lengthy questionnaire and talk sessions (often via Skype) before being presented with a reading list of six books tailored to their individual needs. This is crucial to avoid making matters worse. 

Standford Says Multitasking May Damage Your Brain


People who are regularly bombarded with several streams of electronic information do not pay attention, control their memory or switch from one job to another as well as those who prefer to complete one task at a time, a group of Stanford researchers has found.

In each of their tests, subjects were split into two groups: those who regularly do a lot of media multitasking and those who don’t.

In one experiment, the groups were shown sets of two red rectangles alone or surrounded by two, four or six blue rectangles. Each configuration was flashed twice, and the participants had to determine whether the two red rectangles in the second frame were in a different position than in the first frame.

They were told to ignore the blue rectangles, and the low multitaskers had no problem doing that. But the high multitaskers were constantly distracted by the irrelevant blue images. Their performance was horrible.

Because the high multitaskers showed they couldn’t ignore things, the researchers figured they were better at storing and organizing information. Maybe they had better memories.

The second test proved that theory wrong. After being shown sequences of alphabetical letters, the high multitaskers did a lousy job at remembering when a letter was making a repeat appearance.

The low multitaskers did great  while the high multitaskers were doing worse and worse the further they went along because they kept seeing more letters and had difficulty keeping them sorted in their brains.

Still puzzled

Puzzled but not yet stumped on why the heavy multitaskers weren’t performing well, the researchers conducted a third test. If the heavy multitaskers couldn’t filter out irrelevant information or organize their memories, perhaps they excelled at switching from one thing to another faster and better than anyone else.

Wrong again, the study found.

The test subjects were shown images of letters and numbers at the same time and instructed what to focus on. When they were told to pay attention to numbers, they had to determine if the digits were even or odd. When told to concentrate on letters, they had to say whether they were vowels or consonants.

Again, the heavy multitaskers underperformed the light multitaskers.

They couldn’t stop from thinking about the task they weren’t doing. The high multitaskers are always drawing from all the information in front of them. They can’t keep things separate in their minds.

The researchers are still studying whether chronic media multitaskers are born with an inability to concentrate or are damaging their cognitive control by willingly taking in so much at once. But they’re convinced the minds of multitaskers are not working as well as they could.

“When they’re in situations where there are multiple sources of information coming from the external world or emerging out of memory, they’re not able to filter out what’s not relevant to their current goal,” said Wagner, an associate professor of psychology. “That failure to filter means they’re slowed down by that irrelevant information.”

So maybe it’s time to stop e-mailing if you’re following the game on TV, and rethink singing along with the radio if you’re reading the latest news online. By doing less, you might accomplish more.

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