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People Were Surveyed & Here’s What They Want

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More than 60 per cent of consumers would like earphones that translate languages in real time. About half want the technology to block out a family member’s snoring.

Half of the consumers surveyed said Artificial Intelligence would be useful to check facts posted on social networks.

More than 80 per cent believe that in only five years, long-lasting batteries will put an end to charging concerns, according to the report.

40 percent would like a robot that works and earns income for them, freeing up leisure time, according to the Ericsson consumer trends report for 2018 and beyond.

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375 Million May Be Hunting For Employment When Automation Kicks In

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By 2030 up to 30% of the hours worked globally could be automated. According to a new report by the McKinsey Global Institute  researchers estimate that between 400 million and 800 million people could find themselves displaced by automation and in need of new jobs, depending on how quickly new technologies are adopted. Of this group, as many as 375 million people—about 14% of the global workforce—may need to completely switch occupational categories and learn a new set of skills to find work.

Number of workers needing to find new jobs due to automation

 

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AI technologies like speech analytics, deep-learning platforms and natural language generation have exploded onto the scene in the past 12 months. Soon firms will be able to automate and scale in a more efficient way because software will ultimately be able to learn and adapt rather than require programming.

Automation will transform the workforce as technology advances result in humans increasingly working side by side with software robots These robots don’t herald a gloomy future for jobs. As we showed in our report. Working Side By Side With Robots, automation will replace some jobs and create others, with a net loss of 9.8 million US jobs by 2027 — while transforming at least 25 percent of the remaining jobs.

SONY To Launch Robotic Dog

The robotic dog will feature a bevy of sensors including a camera embedded in the nose, and will go on sale in Japan on Jan. 11 for 198,000 yen ($1,750), excluding tax, plus at least 90,000 yen for a three-year data plan,

Robotic Lawyers On The Rise

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The list of occupations that will be decimated by artificial intelligence and automation is becoming larger and larger with drivers, translators and shop assistants under threat from the rise of the robots,.Now you can add lawyers to the list.

A contest that took place last month pitched over 100 lawyers from many of London’s ritziest firms against an artificial intelligence program called Case Cruncher Alpha.

Both the humans and the AI were given the basic facts of hundreds of PPI (payment protection insurance) and asked to predict whether the Financial Ombudsman would allow a claim.

In all, they submitted 775 predictions and the computer won hands down, with Case Cruncher getting an accuracy rate of 86.6%, compared with 66.3% for the lawyers.

Case Cruncher is not the product of a tech giant but the brainchild of four Cambridge law students. They started out with a simple chatbot that answered legal questions – a bit of a gimmick but it caught on.

Two judges oversaw the competition, Cambridge law lecturer Felix Steffek and Ian Dodd from a company called Prediction, which runs one of the world’s biggest databases of legal cases. He says the youthful Case Cruncher team chose the subject for the contest well.

Ian Dodd thinks AI may replace some of the grunt work done by junior lawyers and paralegals but no machine can talk to a client or argue in front of a High Court judge. He puts it simply: “The knowledge jobs will go, the wisdom jobs will stay.”

Robotic Buddhist Priests Being Used For Funerals In Japan

Buddhist priest for a funeral cost about $2,200 in Japan. So a plastic molding company Nissei Eco Co. decided to  create a robotic Buddhist priest. Nissei has modified an existing robot in the form of SoftBank’s Pepper robot. The Buddhist Pepper robot is going to be around $450 per funeral.

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Biomedicine: They’re Analyzing Your DNA

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23andMe

23andMe first debuted direct-to-consumer tests meant to predict disease in 2013, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration quickly clamped down on that and told the company to stop marketing the tests, saying they could be inaccurate and confusing to consumers.

However, the company was vindicated earlier this year when the FDA revised that decision, declaring 23andMe could sell tests that estimate customers’ risk of certain disease, as long as they don’t purport to diagnose any disease.

Illumina

Early this year, Illumina, the manufacturer of most of the world’s DNA sequencers, unveiled its newest, most efficient machine, NovaSeq, which can sequence as many as 48 entire human genomes in two and a half days, according to the company. Illumina claims the ultra-fast machine will usher in the $100 genome and will open the door for researchers to cheaply sequence DNA in search of rare genetic variants that cause disease.

Sophia Genetics

Sophia Genetics is taking a big-data approach to DNA. The Swiss company is using AI algorithms to continuously learn from thousands of patients’ genomic data. Partnering hospitals take patient samples and run them through a DNA sequencer. The Sophia system sifts through that genetic information to identify mutations in a patient’s genome. The technology is said to quickly and more accurately diagnose conditions like cancer, metabolic disorders, and heart disease.

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