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Archive for the ‘Hair’ Category

Is Racism Becoming The Norm?

Racist Museum In China

A museum in China has removed an exhibit this week that showcased photographs of animals with portraits of black Africans, sparking complaints of racism.

The exhibit titled This Is Africa at the Hubei Provincial Museum in the city of Wuhan displayed a series of diptychs, each one containing a photo of an African person paired with the face of an animal. In a particularly striking example, a child with his mouth wide open was paired with a gorilla and other works included baboons and cheetahs.

The curator said exhibit was eventually removed after complaints by Africans, including some living in China, All the photographs were taken by Yu Huiping, a construction magnate who has traveled to Africa more than 20 times, has previously won awards for his work and is vice-chairman of the Hubei Photographers Association.

About 92% of the population belongs to the dominant Han ethnicity and ethnic minorities mostly live in the sporadically populated far west of the country. African countries are increasingly important trading partners, but cultural stereotypes dominate Chinese popular discourse on the continent.

 

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Ten Thousand new York City kids To Receive $100 For College Savings Account

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Ten Thousand New York City children will start kindergarten with $100 in a college savings account thanks to a public-private partnership intended to boost the number of students attending college.Under the three-year pilot program announced Tuesday, about 3,500 kindergartners will get so-called 529 college savings accounts next fall.Another 3,500 kindergartners will get the accounts in the fall of 2018 and a third group in the fall of 2019.

Families that meet savings benchmarks will get up to another $200 in matching funds.The program is being funded with $10 million from Jon Gray, the global head of real estate at the investment firm Blackstone Group.It will be overseen by a newly created nonprofit called NYC Kids Rise.Similar programs exist in cities including San Francisco and Boston.

 

Arabian Princess Fashionista

Princess Deena Aljuhani Abdulaziz of Saudi Arabia isn’t just any royal. She is a mother of three, runs a fashion business called D’NA, nurtures emerging designers (past talents include Prabal Gurung, Jason Wu, Mary Katrantzou, and Erdem), and is editor in chief of Vogue Arabia.

The Princess Is All About Elegance in an Off-the-Shoulder White Gown

Her Outfits Fall Into the Modern and Feminine Silhouette Category

But Princess Deena Aljuhani Abdulaziz Can Look Sporty Too

The Princess's Coat Collection Is as Fierce as Anyone's

Princess Deena Aljuhani Abdulaziz Will Never Be Underdressed

A Fur Stole Gives Her Outfit That Luxurious Vibe

She Loves Her Ballgown Skirts

Like All Power Women, Red Is Definitely in Her Colour Wheel

She Finds Fresh Ways to Remix a White Button-Down — Like With a Poufy, Pink Skirt

The Princess Will Give Any Colour or Print a Try

And Will Even Wear Head-to-Toe Neon Green

Break The Walls

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US haircare brand Shea Moisture, is tackling differences in the representation of white and black women… The US-based haircare brand’s ad features actresses, influencers and bloggers with natural hair explaining their experience of shopping for beauty products and the issues faced by Afro-American women: ‘There is a section called ethnic and there is an aisle called beauty’. The commercial concludes with a voiceover stating that ‘We are Shea Moisture, and we can now be found in the beauty aisle – where we all belong’.

African American Hair Causing Controversy

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The nation’s first female, self-made millionaire made her fortune selling beauty and hair products she’d developed to African-American women, beginning in the early 1900s. Now a new line of products—Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture—is bringing her legacy to a new generation.

Historian A’Lelia Bundles, Walker’s great-great-granddaughter is very excited,

the product launch by Sundial Brands, is known for its SheaMoisture and Nubian Heritage lines. But instead of being available at drugstores such as CVS, Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture products will be sold exclusively at beauty giant Sephora and Sephora.com. The four-collection, 25-product line will be part of what the global market-research firm Mintel called in 2015the $2.7 billion black hair-care industry.

Walker was born Sarah Breedlove in 1867, the daughter of Louisiana sharecroppers. Widowed at the age of 20, Breedlove began losing her hair, and in 1905 she developed a system involving scalp preparation and lotions that revolutionized black hair care. She took the name Madam C.J. Walker after marrying her third husband, Charles Walker, and her treatment became known as the “Walker System.” She first sold her homemade products directly to African-American women. By 1910, when she moved from Pittsburgh to Indianapolis, Walker had a fleet of more than 3,000 workers who sold her product line of nearly 20 hair and skin items door to door and by mail order.

“Her immediate focus was growing hair,” said Bundles. “She created a system to cleanse hair more often in an era where many had no indoor plumbing and a lot of women were going bald. … Her initial product was a shampoo and ointment with sulfur. … The Walker System was meant to address hygiene and healthy hair and hair growth.”

Walker used her fortune to fund scholarships at the Tuskegee Institute and donated huge sums to the NAACP and the Black YMCA, among other charities. The charter of her company provided that only a woman could serve as president. When her daughter, A’Lelia, inherited Walker’s sumptuous New York City mansion, it became a gathering place for members of the Harlem Renaissance.

Walker died in 1919, but Sundial Brands CEO Richelieu Dennis is focused on continuing the legacy of this entrepreneur whose achievements he has always admired.

The Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture line will range in price from $24 to $32.

It’s clear that African-American hair care is big business. In its 2015 research report, Mintel noted that the market for black hair care products is up 7 percent since 2010. The report also found that products specifically targeted to black consumers are becoming more widely available as mainstream brands such as Revlon and L’Oreal develop products to address the specific needs of black buyers. Interestingly, as more women wear natural hairstyles, Mintel research shows that sales of relaxers have dropped 19 percent in the past two years.

 Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture line brings in two beauty breakthroughs: dual-encapsulation oil technology and a natural silicone alternative.

The Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture line launches at Sephora and Sephora.com on March 4.

 

 

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The nation’s first female, self-made millionaire made her fortune selling beauty and hair products she’d developed to African-American women, beginning in the early 1900s.

 Historian A’Lelia Bundles, Walker’s great-great-granddaughter is very excited about the launch  a new product called “This moment” launched by Sundial Brands, known for its SheaMoisture and Nubian Heritage lines. But instead of being available at drugstores such as CVS, Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture products will be sold exclusively at beauty giant Sephora and Sephora.com. The four-collection, 25-product line will be part of what the global market-research firm Mintel called in 2015 the $2.7 billion black hair-care industry.

“It is a statement to be in a place like Sephora,” Bundles said, and she is pleased that Sundial is the force behind the new line. “They have been wonderful about wanting to make sure that the legacy is part of the overall story that is going on.”

Walker was born Sarah Breedlove in 1867, the daughter of Louisiana sharecroppers. Widowed at the age of 20, Breedlove began losing her hair, and in 1905 she developed a system involving scalp preparation and lotions that revolutionized black hair care. She took the name Madam C.J. Walker after marrying her third husband, Charles Walker, and her treatment became known as the “Walker System.” She first sold her homemade products directly to African-American women. By 1910, when she moved from Pittsburgh to Indianapolis, Walker had a fleet of more than 3,000 workers who sold her product line of nearly 20 hair and skin items door to door and by mail order.

“Her immediate focus was growing hair,” said Bundles. “She created a system to cleanse hair more often in an era where many had no indoor plumbing and a lot of women were going bald. … Her initial product was a shampoo and ointment with sulfur. … The Walker System was meant to address hygiene and healthy hair and hair growth.”

Walker used her fortune to fund scholarships at the Tuskegee Institute and donated huge sums to the NAACP and the Black YMCA, among other charities. The charter of her company provided that only a woman could serve as president. When her daughter, A’Lelia, inherited Walker’s sumptuous New York City mansion, it became a gathering place for members of the Harlem Renaissance.

Walker died in 1919, however, Sundial Brands CEO Richelieu Dennis is focused on continuing the legacy of this entrepreneur whose achievements he has always admired.

The Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture line will range in price from $24 to $32, and while Dennis acknowledges that some might find that a little pricey, he said, “We feel that Madam Walker’s legacy is one of prestige, and one of pride.” He also says that selling it through Sephora aligns well because he sees the beauty firm as a globally recognized retailer of “prestige beauty.”

It’s clear that African-American hair care is big business. In its 2015 report, Mintel research noted that the market for black hair care products is up 7 percent since 2010. The report also found that products specifically targeted to black consumers are becoming more widely available as mainstream brands such as Revlon and L’Oreal develop products to address the specific needs of black buyers. Interestingly, as more women wear natural hairstyles, Mintel research shows that sales of relaxers have dropped 19 percent in the past two years.

Bundles says that the launch of the product line is even sweeter for her because it addresses all hair types. At 63, she says, she’s been through every possible hair journey.

“For my generation, having an Afro … we had one style, either a big blowout or a really short natural,” Bundles said. “Part of what I like about this collection is, there is something for every texture: locks, curly-kinky, wavy and heat-treated. … Now a younger generation is teaching all of us something about letting your hair speak for itself.”

The Madam C.J. Walker Beauty Culture line launches at Sephora and Sephora.com on March 4

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