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Archive for the ‘Gaming’ Category

Video Game Designers Are Getting Better At Creating Hair For Black Characters

 

This year’s E3 black character’s hair is seen as refreshing. io9‘s Evan Narcisse says in his essay for anthology State of PlayAs a black gamer, I’ve also noticed these problems, particularly for black women. A lot of black characters have permed, straight hair, or textures that aren’t quite right

 

Latest Drama In eSports, Joshua-Lee Drops Bombshell

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 Former Splyce player Joshua-Lee ‘Joshh’ Shephard accusing his organization of “not paying” him in a TwitLonger post.

Marty ‘LazerChicken’ Strenczewilk, replied to the original post of Joshh’s TwitLonger on the official Call of Duty Competitive Reddit.

Calling the decision to bring back Josh under Splyce “one of the biggest mistakes we ever made,” LazerChicken said that Josh’s actions were “directly costing the organization” and that the organization “fined him from his salary (not his prize money)… to keep our team running.”

These fines came after the organization restructured their contracts to not “get screwed by players like Josh ever again who directly cost us money… as any sports team would do.”

Joshh claims the organization owes him “$5000+ from 3 events and 3/4 of a months salary” after Epsilon paid the fee to acquire him off Splyce.

He also claims that he was “told” from an unknown, unnamed member of Splyce management that he would “not [be] getting my money because they made a loss from selling me and buying Zer0.”

Joshh also qualified his post by saying that he was not “perfect when working for them, but who is?” Josh is currently is under contract with Epsilon, who is qualified for the 2017 Call of Duty Championship

Joshh Twitlonger

eSport’s Overwatch Getting A Minor League

Just as in real sports, the quality of your players can improve if you have some kind of a farm system where aspiring top-level pros can compete against each other. Overwatch Contenders is like its Triple-A league.

Overwatch will complete its first year on the market on May 23. A a short period, it has attracted over 30 million players and become popular in the esports market, which market researcher firm Newzoo predicts will grow to a $696 million business in 2017. It’s also a paid game, not free-to-play, so all of those players spent money ($40 for the base version on PC, $60 on console) upfront.

The first season of Contenders, which Blizzard is calling Season Zero, will have open signups. Online-only qualifiers will determine the top eight teams in North America and European regions with separate tournaments. Each one will have a prize pool of $50,000. The large Asia region, meanwhile, is not a part of these first seasons

Season One will then have those top teams fighting against each other in more tournaments, giving them a chance to play competitive matches regularly. It also gives Overwatch League team owners a chance to scout out additions for their rosters.

Facebook Wants In On eSports

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Katowice, Poland is home to the largest eSports event in the world—Intel Extreme Masters. Photo courtesy ESL
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Facebook said Thursday that it has partnered with ESL, formerly known as the Electronic Sports League, to live stream video game tournaments, also known as eSports.

As part of the deal, Facebook  will live stream upcoming ESL contests in which players battle each other in the first-person military shooter game, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. Facebook will also host a weekly show dedicated to highlights and interviews with players participating in the Counter Strike tournament.

Each week ESL will live stream 30 hours of Counter-Strike tournaments, known as RankS competitions, via Facebook, the companies said. The RankS competition involves 300 gamers from North America and Europe who battle to win a cut of the $40,000 prize money ESL awards each month. In total, ESL plans to broadcast over 5,500 hours of gaming tournaments, starting in June.

 

eSports & Immigration

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The eSports economy is expected to grow to $696 million, a year-on-year growth of 41.3% and the global eSports audience is expected to reach 385 million in 2017. Total prize money in 2016 reached $93.3 million, up from $61.0 million in 2015. According to Sports Illustrated, in 2016, eSports events sold out Key Arena in Seattle, Nationwide Arena in Columbus, the Staples Center in Los Angeles and Madison Square Garden in New York. The purse for the Seattle event, The International Dota 2 Championship, was $20,770,460, which Sports Illustrated points out is roughly double the total payout of The Masters. In 2017, major eSports competitions have been scheduled across North America, Europe, South Korea, and China, to name a few, making eSports truly international.

eSports is surging and whether or not esports professionals are appropriately considered “athletes” is hotly debated. One of the reasons this debate matters is because if they aren’t athletes, they don’t qualify for P-1 visas. And if they don’t qualify for P-1 visas, it can be very difficult for these professionals to travel to the U.S. to participate in major competitive events.

Look Out eSports-Now There’s Drone Sports

Drone Racing League (DRL) organizes drone races across the globe and films them using a mix of camera drones, stationary cameras and first-person-view (FPV) video. Since its launch in 2015–2016, its races have been viewed on YouTube, Twitch and Facebook over 43 million times. DRL events have also been on TV, and the organization expects the coming season to be viewable on TV screens in up to 75 countries.

Each drone is equipped with a camera that streams images in real time to first person view (FPV) goggles worn by the pilots. The pilot literally feels like he or she is sitting on the nose of the drone, as it flies around courses in venues like outdoor stadiums, factory buildings or tents.

“Drone racing essentially means that a pilot can shift their consciousness into the aircraft, flying through tiny gaps without any fear of physical danger.

When you wear FPV goggles you share the pilot’s experience, something that has often been compared to Star Wars or a computer game.

 

 

NBA 2K18’ ARRIVES SEPTEMBER 19

BA 2K18 will arrive on September 19  Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, PC, Xbox 360, and PlayStation 3.
For the Legend Edition, Shaq will appear in the No. 32 jersey that he wore for the Miami Heat across his three-plus year stint in South Beach. It will cost $100 and includes a Shaq poster, five Panini trading cards, some stickers, and a slew of digital content, including 100,000 worth of in-game currency, 20 weekly MyTeam packs, undisclosed Shaq items, and “more.”
The Legend Edition Gold will feature Shaq wearing No. 34 for the Los Angeles Lakers, the team that he won three straight NBA titles with alongside Kobe Bryant. Also,Gold edition purchasers will receive an exclusive Shaq lenticular print. On the digital side of things, you’ll receive 250,000 worth of in-game currency, 40 weekly MyTEAM packs, as well as the Shaq items, and the mysterious “more” content. The Legend Edition Gold will sell for $150.

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