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Appropriations Committee Voted To Approve Funding for Libraries

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The full House Appropriations Committee voted to approve FY2018 funding for libraries. By a 28-22 margin, the committee approved the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education (LHHS) funding bill, which proposes roughly $231 million for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)—including $183.6 million for Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) programs, and $27 million for the Department of Education’s Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) program—essentially at 2017 funding levels.

In addition to saving the IMLS, the LHHS bill includes level funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. However, it funds the Department of Education (DOE) at $66 billion—a cut of $2.4 billion from 2017, which includes the elimination of some important library-related programs, including the DOE’s Striving Readers program. ALA officials said they would work to restore it.

Meanwhile, on July 18, the House Appropriations Committee approved by a 30-21 margin the FY2018 Interior and Environment Appropriations, which includes $145 million each for the NEH and the NEA, roughly equal to FY 2017 funding levels.

The key votes come after President Trump’s call  in May to eliminate IMLS and virtually all federal funding for libraries, as well as a host of other vital programs and agencies, including the NEH and the NEA. And, it comes after Congress, earlier in May, passed a belated 2017 budget that actually upped the IMLS, NEH, and NEA budgets.

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Apple’s 1990 Sneakers Going For $30,000. Do You Own A Pair?

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When Apple launched its first color desktop computer, in 1990, the tech giant also created a prototype pair of sneakers with its signature rainbow logo.

They were first sold to a lucky Apple employee some time in the mid-’90s, according to BitRebels.  They later sold for only $79 on eBay  back in 2007.

In the years that followed, the whereabouts of the shoes were unknown — until a friend of Leon Benrimon, director of modern and contemporary art at Heritage Auctions, found them at a garage sale in San Francisco.

Now, Heritage Auctions is auctioning off the pair at its Beverly Hills location. Bidding will begin at 11 am on June 11, and the sneakers are expected to go for at least $30,000. The starting bid will be $15,000. The Adidas sneakers, size 9 and a half, are made from the typical white leather material of the times. They feature Apple’s logo on the tongue and on the side. The soles are made from rubber that supposedly doesn’t leave skid marks.

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Beverly Loraine Greene

  Senior Portrait c. 1935, Image 0003076
Courtesy of the University of Illinois Archives

– See more at: http://www.blackpast.org/aah/greene-beverly-loraine-1915-1957#sthash.3nYxURDX.dpuf

Beverly Loraine Greene, believed to be the first African American woman architect in the United States, was born in Chicago, Illinois on October 4, 1915.  She grew up in Chicago and was raised by her father, James A. Greene, a lawyer, and her mother, Vera Greene, a homemaker.  Greene earned a Bachelor of Science degree in architectural engineering from the University of Illinois in 1936.  One year later she earned a Master’s of Science degree in city planning and housing from the same university.  On December 28, 1942, at the age of twenty-seven, Greene was registered in the State of Illinois as an architect.

After completing the second degree, Greene returned to her hometown and initially worked for the Chicago Housing Authority.  Greene was one of the first African Americans in the agency.   Despite her education and her official recognition as an architect, Greene found it difficult to obtain jobs in the profession. She moved to New York City in 1945 to work on the planned Stuyvesant Town private housing project in lower Manhattan being built by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company.  Given her past experiences, and the Company’s prior announcement that African Americans would not be allowed to live in Stuyvesant Town, Greene believed she would not be hired.  She applied anyway and to her surprise she was the first architect employed on the project.  Greene quit however to accept a scholarship at Columbia University where she would study urban planning.  She received a Master’s Degree in Architecture from Columbia on June 5, 1945.

Greene went on to work for a number of notable architectural firms.  Her employers during that period included the architectural firm headed by Isadore Rosefield which specialized in health care and hospital design.  She also worked with Edward Durell Stone on the arts complex at Sarah Lawrence College and in 1952 on a theater at the University of Arkansas.  During her time with the architectural firm headed by Marcel Breuer she worked on the UNESCO United Nations headquarters in Paris, France which was completed in 1958.   Her next projects included buildings at New York University (NYU) which were completed between 1956 and 1961. Greene never saw most of the buildings at NYU she helped design.  Beverly Loraine Greene died on August 22, 1957 at age forty-one in New York City. Ironically she had also designed the Unity Funeral Home, the building in which her memorial service was held.

 

Ikea’s Flat Pack Houses For Sale

Retailing for $86,500, this house will be the first in a series of designs offering people an eco-friendly Swedish-inspired home with a functional, wide-open living area that makes careful use of all the available space.

IKEA worked with Oregon-based architectural firm Ideabox to come up with aktiv’s design, which features, as you would expect, a whole of kit from IKEA.

You’ll find state-of-the-art cooking appliances inside, including an induction cooktop and convection oven. As well as a counter-depth refrigerator, the kitchen is also equipped with a dishwasher.

The bedroom incorporates plenty of storage in the form of IKEA closets, while the bathroom has a two-sink vanity and four drawers together with a storage cabinet. The home also comes with IKEA flooring, though one assumes without the arrows.

At just over 53 feet long and 14 feet wide, aktiv is certainly compact yet looking at the images, seems comfortably spacious. One possible annoyance is that the bathroom is en suite, so if you have guests over they’ll have to pass through your bedroom every time they need to powder their nose.

Happily, it seems the biggest challenge facing buyers of the flat-pack house will be getting the darn thing in the trolley, as help is given with constructing aktiv. “For those of us IKEA fans, the pure delight of walking and imagining our way through an IKEA store quickly turns to the daunting task of assembly when we get home,” Ideabox’s website says. “Not a worry… When your [home] arrives, all of the cabinets, countertops, and flooring are installed… it’s like the best of everything!”

Ideabox presented aktiv to the public last week at the recent Home & Garden Show in Portland, Oregon.

 

New York City’s Cultural Future

Brooklyn Borough-Wide Workshop. Image courtesy of Hester Street Collaborative and Create NYC

Queens Borough-Wide Workshop. Image courtesy of Hester Street Collaborative and Create NYC.

New York City’s Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA)a report detailing the results of roughly seven months of public engagement conducted in the lead up to the city’s forthcoming cultural plan. The agency engaged 188,000 New Yorkers—via focus groups, phone surveys, and hundreds of community events—in order to compile its brief.

The plan’s website Residents are also invited to provide in-person feedback at city-wide events through May 31st. DCLA commissioner Tom Finkelpearl says The responses will be “data points,” used to further refine the city’s first-ever cultural plan.

Why Would A Painting Of Scull Cost So Much?

  • Photo via Yusaku Maezawa on Twitter: “I am a lucky man.”

    A poet, musician, and graffiti prodigy in late-1970s New York, Jean-Michel Basquiat’s painting style consist of obsessive scribbling, elusive symbols and diagrams, and mask-and-skull imagery by the time he was 20. “I don’t think about art while I work,” he once said. “I think about life.” Basquiat drew his subjects from his own Caribbean heritage—his father was Haitian and his mother of Puerto Rican descent—and a convergence of African-American, African, and Aztec cultural histories with Classical themes and contemporary heroes like athletes and musicians. Often associated with Neo-expressionism, Basquiat received massive acclaim in only a few short years, showing alongside artists like Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and Francesco Clemente. In 1983, he met Andy Warhol, who would come to be a mentor and idol. The two collaborated on a series of paintings before Warhol’s death in 1987, followed by Basquiat’s own untimely passing a year later.

    American, 1960-1988, New York, New York, based in New York, New York

    Yusaku Maezawa, the Japanese e-commerce billionaire, purchased Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Untitled (1982) at Thursday night’s Contemporary Art evening sale at Sotheby’s. The canvas was hammered down at $98 million after a dramatic 10-minute bidding war, coming to $110.4 million with the buyer’s premium. It marks the highest auction price ever for an American artist—unseating Andy Warhol, whose $105 million auction record was set by Silver Car Crash (Double Disaster) (1963) at Sotheby’s New York in November 2013—and the second-highest price for any contemporary work.

     

     

 

Hotel Workers Accidently Whitewash A 5 Million Dollar Painting

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construction workers painted over an original piece by the legendary street artist tagged on the outside wall of a three-bedroom villa at the GeeJam Hotel in Jamaica. The street artist is Banksy and his work can easily fetch millions. When the mistake was realized, painters and owners were mortified.

The British newspaper reported that the hotel’s owners are friends with the secretive graffiti artist, and after spending time at the establishment, Banksy’s left his mark 11 different times—

The hotel is trying to strip away the two layers of paint to see if they can restore the Banksy rats. It’s unclear how much the three stencils were worth, but the Mail values them at about $5 million.

 

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