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MIT researchers led by  professor Dina Katabi has developed software that uses variations in radio signals to recognize human silhouettes through walls and track their movements.

Researchers say the technology will be able to help health care providers and families keep closer tabs on toddlers and the elderly, and it could be a new strategic tool for law enforcement and the military.

The device displays the signal on a screen, where the person’s movements can be tracked in real time. It depicts the target as a red dot moving around the room, occupying a chair and speeding up or slowing down.

The wireless signals used to track a person’s motions also can measure the individual’s breathing and heart rate — and potentially identify the person based on the shape of his or her skeleton. The technology raises questions about privacy rights and intrusion, and the team gave serious thought to those implications.

The user interface will be friendly for setting it up and using it at home, but it will be very hard to use it to track someone just by pointing it at their wall” A company set up to market the technology, aka Emerald, will spin out of the MIT lab next year, with a goal of marketing the device early in 2017, and it’s expected to sell for $250-$300. The team is working to make the device smaller and to develop an interface that will let users configure it through a smartphone app.

Although NYPD has X ray vans and other x ray equipment 

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